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November 8, 2016 — California General Election
Special District

John Swett Unified School District
Measure Q Bond Measure - 55% Approval Required

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Election Results

Passed

3,570 votes yes (65.86%)

1,851 votes no (34.14%)

100% of precincts reporting (11/11).

6,113 ballots counted.

Bond Measure
— undefined

To complete renovation, modernization, and safety upgrades at John Swett High School that update classrooms, science labs, and career technical education facilities; improve student safety/security; provide for college/career readiness; and renovate, construct, and equip classrooms, facilities, sites and ventilation; shall John Swett Unified School District issue $22,000,000 in bonds at rates within legal limits, with citizens' oversight, annual audits, no funds for administrators, and all funds spent to benefit John Swett High school and students?

What is this proposal?

Measure Details — Official information about this measure

YES vote means

     A “yes” vote authorizes the issuance of the bonds and the levy of taxes as estimated in the Tax Rate Statement to repay the bonded indebtedness. A “yes” vote by 55% of the voters within the District voting on the measure is required for passage of this measure.

 

NO vote means

A “no” vote on this measure disapproves the issuance of the bonds and the levy of the taxes for the bonded indebtedness.

Impartial analysis / Proposal

Contra Costa County Elections Division

The California Constitution provides that school districts may issue bonds for the construction, reconstruction, rehabilitation or replacement of school facilities, including the furnishing and equipping of school facilities or the acquisition or lease of real property for school facilities, with the approval of 55% of the voters voting at an election for that purpose.

 

     By resolution, the John Swett Unified School District has proposed that bonds of the District be issued in an amount up to $20,000,000. This measure provides that proceeds from the sale of the bonds will generally be used to “complete renovation, modernization, and safety upgrades at John Swett High School that update classrooms, science labs, and career technical education facilities; improve student safety/security; provide for college/career readiness; and renovate, construct, and equip classrooms, facilities, sites and ventilation.” The types of projects to be financed with the bond proceeds are set forth in the Bond Project List attached to the resolution of the District’s Board of Trustees. The measure provides that a citizens’ oversight committee will be established to ensure that bond proceeds are properly expended and that annual performance and financial audits will be conducted. The measure further provides that bond proceeds will only be used for the purposes specified in the measure, and not for any other purpose.

     Approval of this measure authorizes the levy of ad valorem taxes upon taxable property to repay the bonded indebtedness, both principal and interest, in each year that bonds are outstanding. The John Swett Unified School District has prepared a Tax Rate Statement, which represents the school district’s best estimates of the property tax rates required to service the bonds. The estimated highest tax rate required to be levied to fund the bonds is expected to be $32 per $100,000 of assessed valuation.

     Approval of the measure does not guarantee that the proposed project or projects in the District that are the subject of bonds under the measure will be funded beyond the local revenues generated by the measure. The proposed project or projects may assume the receipt of matching state funds, which could be subject to appropriation by the Legislature or approval of a statewide bond measure.

     A “yes” vote authorizes the issuance of the bonds and the levy of taxes as estimated in the Tax Rate Statement to repay the bonded indebtedness. A “yes” vote by 55% of the voters within the District voting on the measure is required for passage of this measure.

     A “no” vote on this measure disapproves the issuance of the bonds and the levy of the taxes for the bonded indebtedness.

Tax rate

Contra Costa County Elections Division

An election will be held in the John Swett Unified School District (the “District”) on November 8, 2016, to authorize the sale of up to $22,000,000 in bonds of the District to finance school facilities as described in the measure. If such bonds are authorized and sold, principal and interest on the bonds will be payable only from the proceeds of tax levies made upon the taxable property in the District. The following information is provided in compliance with Sections 9400-9404 of the Elections Code of the State of California. Such information is based upon the best estimates and projections presently available from official sources, upon experience within the District, and other demonstrable factors. Based upon the foregoing and projections of the District’s assessed valuation, the following information is provided:

The best estimate of the tax rate which would be required to be levied to fund this bond issue during the first fiscal year after the sale of the first series of bonds, based on a projection of assessed valuations available at the time of filing of this statement, is $0.0320 per $100 of assessed valuation (or $32.00 per $100,000 of assessed value) for fiscal year 2017-18.

 

    1. The best estimate of the tax rate which would be required to be levied to fund this bond issue during the first fiscal year after the sale of the last series of bonds, based on a projection of assessed valuations available at the time of filing of this statement, is $0.0320 per $100 of assessed valuation (or $32.00 per $100,000 of assessed value) for fiscal year 2017-18.

 

    1. The best estimate of the highest tax rate which would be required to be levied to fund this bond issue, based on a projection of assessed valuations available at the time of filing of this statement, is $0.0320 per $100 of assessed valuation (or $32.00 per $100,000 of assessed value).

 

    1. The best estimate of the average tax rate which would be required to be levied to fund this bond issue, based on a projection of assessed valuations available at the time of filing of this statement, is $0.03174 per $100 of assessed valuation (or $31.74 per $100,000 of assessed value.

 

  1. The best estimate of the total debt service, including the principal and interest, that would be required to be repaid if all the bonds are issued and sold is approximately $37,368,000.

Voters should note the estimated tax rate is based on the ASSESSED VALUE of taxable property on the County’s official tax rolls, not on the property’s market value. In addition, taxpayers eligible for a property tax exemption, such as the homeowner’s exemption, will be taxed at a lower effective tax rate than described above. Property owners should consult their own property tax bills and tax advisors to determine their property’s assessed value and any applicable tax exemptions.

The attention of all voters is directed to the fact that the foregoing information is based upon projections and estimates only, which are not binding upon the District. The actual debt service, the tax rates and the years in which they will apply may vary from those presently estimated, due to variations from these estimates in the timing of bond sales, the amount of bonds sold and market interest rates at the time of each sale, and actual assessed valuations over the term of repayment of the bonds. The date of sale and the amount of bonds sold at any given time will be determined by the District based on the need for project funds and other factors. The actual interest rates at which the bonds will be sold will depend on the bond market at the time of sale. Actual future assessed valuations will depend upon the amount and value of taxable property within the District as determined by the County Assessor in the annual assessment and the equalization process.

Rob Stockberger, Superintendent
John Swett Unified School District

Published Arguments — Arguments for and against the ballot measure

Arguments FOR

VOTE YES on Measure Q to protect the outstanding quality of education that John Swett High School provides to local students preparing for college, careers and successful lives.
John Swett High School, our community’s only high school, has educated generations of local students since opening in 1927. Although well maintained, our facilities are aging and overdue for repairs and upgrades.
The state of our classrooms, Career Technical Education (CTE) facilities, science labs and technology is adversely impacting teaching and learning. VOTING YES on Q will authorize locally controlled funding for the completion of critically needed facility repairs and modernizations.
Measure Q ensures that students planning to attend college can properly prepare, and non-college bound students seeking jobs immediately after graduation receive the career training they need.
Measure Q will:

 

  • Modernize high school academic and job-training classrooms to prepare students for college and careers in fields like health sciences, engineering, agriculture, and skilled trades.
  • Upgrade educational technology and science labs to support 21st Century learning.
  • Repair/replace deteriorated plumbing, lighting, heating, ventilation and electrical systems.
  • Improve campus safety, security, fire protection, pick-up/drop-off zones and disabled access.
  • Remove hazardous materials and make necessary seismic upgrades.

ALL Measure Q funds must stay local to benefit our John Swett High School. The State cannot take this funding away.
Taxpayer protections are REQUIRED. NO funding is allowed for administrator salaries or pensions. MANDATORY audits and Independent Citizens’ Oversight will ensure proper spending.
Maintaining our local high school facilities is a wise investment. Good schools protect property values. The longer we wait to make these improvements, the more expensive they will be.
Please join teachers, parents, alumni, community leaders, residents and local businesses taking a positive step to help John Swett High School continue to thrive.
VOTE YES on Q.
Harold Burnett, Crockett Firefighter, John Swett High School Careers Academy Board Member
Connie Batchelder, Citizen’s Bond Oversight Committee Member, Rodeo Sanitary District Board Member
James Machado, Chemistry & Electrical Engineering Teacher at JSHS, Assistant Scoutmaster, Crockett Boy Scouts
Josephine A. Orozco, Local Business Owner, Rodeo Chamber of Commerce Board Member, Rodeo Parks & Recreation Advisory
Bill Concannon, Crockett Business Owner, Former John Swett Unified Governing Board Member

— Contra Costa County Elections Division

Arguments AGAINST

None Filed.

— Contra Costa County Elections Division

More information

Opinions & Analysis (1)

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