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November 6, 2018 — California General Election
Special District

South Monterey County Joint Union High School District
Measure R Bond Measure - 55% Approval Required

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Election Results

Passing

3,643 votes yes (60.96%)

2,333 votes no (39.04%)

Academic/Vocational Classroom Improvement Bond Measure
— undefined

South Monterey County Joint Union High School District Academic/Vocational Classroom Improvement Measure. To upgrade academic, vocational/agriculture education classrooms, replace outdated science, technology/computer labs, provide classrooms for technology careers, remove hazardous materials like asbestos/lead paint, construct, acquire, repair classrooms, facilities/equipment, shall this South Monterey County Joint Union High School District measure authorizing $20,000,000 in bonds at legal rates, levying 2-cents/$100 assessed valuation, approximately $1,400,000 annually for local schools while bonds are outstanding, be adopted, requiring citizen oversight, audits, without increasing current tax rates?

What is this proposal?

Measure Details — Official information about this measure

YES vote means

A “Yes” vote on this measure is a vote in favor of the issuance of $20 million for general obligation bonds to be used for listedrepairs and upgrades to academic and vocational classrooms within the South Monterey County Joint Union High School District (the “District,” which includes King City and Greenfield High Schools).

 

NO vote means

A “No” vote on this measure is a vote against the issuanceof $20 million in school general obligation bonds.  

Impartial analysis / Proposal

Monterey County Elections Dept.

Measure R would authorize the South Monterey County Joint Union High School District (the “District,”) which includes King City and Greenfield High Schools, to issue up to $20 million dollars in bonds for the purpose of performing repairs and maintenance to school buildings within the District, including technology upgrades to academic and vocational classrooms in order to prepare students for careers in agriculture, public safety, computer science, engineering and information systems. 

The specific Project List included with the Measure describes the proposed projects.  The District may only use bond proceeds for listed repairs, maintenance to school buildings and upgrades to academic and vocational classrooms.  The bond proceeds may not be used for any other purposes, such as teacher and administrator salaries or school operating expenses. Inclusion of a project on the Project List does not guarantee that specific project will be funded or completed.  

If approved, the measure will authorize the District to issue general obligation bonds at legal rates (the interest rate will not exceed the maximum permitted by law), levying 2-cents/$100 assessed valuation, approximately $1,400,000 annually, with oversight and audits.  The District believes that there will not be an increase in current taxes, as any tax rate levied will not exceed the Proposition 39 limits per year, per $100,000 of assessed valuation of taxable property.  

The District has committed to conduct performance and financial audits to ensure that bond proceeds are spent as specified in the measure.  Additionally, the District will form an independent Citizen’s Oversight Committee to monitor expenditures and audits.   

The measure was placed on the ballot by the Board of Trustees of the South Monterey County Joint Union High School District (the “District”) and must be approved by fifty-five percent (55%) of the registered voters who cast a vote, or the bonds may not be issued.    

If proceeds from bonds are not enough, the District will not complete the projects as there is no funding beyond the local revenues generated by this Measure.  These bonds are not subject to Education Code 15122.5, therefore, state matching funds are not available.  These projects are not dependent on state funding for completion.   

A “Yes” vote on this measure is a vote in favor of the issuance of $20 million for general obligation bonds to be used for listed repairs and upgrades to academic and vocational classrooms within the South Monterey County Joint Union High School District (the “District,” which includes King City and Greenfield High Schools). 

A “No” vote on this measure is a vote against the issuance of $20 million in school general obligation bonds.   

Dated:  August 10, 2018      

/s/ CHARLES J. MCKEE 

 Monterey County Counsel 

 

Tax rate

Monterey County Elections Dept.

TAX RATE STATEMENT 

REGARDING PROPOSED 

$20,000,000 

SOUTH MONTEREY COUNTY JOINT UNION HIGH SCHOOL DISTRICT 

GENERAL OBLIGATION BONDS  

An election will be held in the South Monterey County Joint Union High School District (the “District”) on November 6, 2018 to authorize the sale of $20,000,000 in general obligation bonds. If such bonds are authorized and sold, principal and interest on the bonds will be payable only from the proceeds of tax levies made on the taxable property in the District. These estimates are based on projections derived from information obtained from official sources and other demonstrable factors. The actual tax rates and the years in which they will apply may vary depending on the timing of bond sales, the amount of bonds sold at each sale, and actual increases in assessed valuations. The following information is submitted in compliance with Sections 9400-9404 of the California Elections Code. 

i. The best estimate of the average annual tax rate that would be required to fund this bond issue over the entire duration of bond debt service, based on estimated assessed valuations available at the time of filing of this statement, is $0.02 per $100 ($20.00 per $100,000) of assessed valuation. 

ii. The best estimate of the final fiscal year in which the tax required to fund this bond issue is anticipated to be collected is fiscal year 2050-51. 

iii. The best estimate of the highest tax rate that would be required to fund this bond issue, based on estimated assessed valuations available at the time of filing this statement, is $0.02 per $100 ($20.00 per $100,000) of assessed valuation, which is projected to be the same in every fiscal year the bonds remain outstanding. 

iv. The best estimate from official sources of the total debt service, including the principal and interest, that would be required to be repaid if all the bonds are issued and sold will be approximately $44 million. 

Based upon the forgoing and projections of the District’s assessed valuation, the timing of the bond sales and the amount of bonds sold at any given time will be determined by the needs of the District and other factors. Actual assessed valuations will depend upon the amount and value of taxable property within the District as determined by the County Assessor in the assessment and the equalization process. 

Voters should note that the estimated tax rates are based on the ASSESSED VALUE of taxable property in the District as shown on the County’s official tax rolls, not on the property’s market value. Property owners should consult their own property tax bills to determine their property’s assessed value and any applicable tax exemptions. 

Dated: 7/26/2018 

/s/ Brian Walker 

Superintendent 

South Monterey County Joint Union High School District 

 

Published Arguments — Arguments for and against the ballot measure

Arguments FOR

Vote Yes on Measure R.

Greenfield High School and King City High School are the cornerstones of our respective communities, and represent the future of our cities. While well maintained, our classrooms are nearly 70 years old, our science classrooms and labs were built in the 1950’s and lack the up-to-date technology students need to succeed. Measure R provides a prudent, responsible plan to address our most critical needs.

Measure R will help train our students for important careers after high school, including agriculture, public safety, computer science, engineering, and information systems.

ProjectsInclude: 

• Upgrade academic/vocational classrooms;

• Provide classrooms for careers in agriculture/animal science;

• Replace outdated science, technology/computer labs;

• Remove hazardous materials such as asbestos/lead paint;

• Improve library technology/study space;

• Build a new auxiliary gymnasium;

Measure R will not increase your current tax assessment, and is tax deductible.  

Transparency and Fiscal Accountability Keep Every Penny in our Schools. 

Measure R requires a transparent system of accountability, including a project list detailing how the money will be allocated. It includes a Citizens’ Oversight Committee and independent audits to ensure the money is appropriately spent.

“Even if you do not have school-age children, protecting the quality of our schools and the quality of life in our community is a wise investment that helps keep our property values strong.” Linda Benway

Join parents, teachers, business and community leaders in Greenfield, King City, San Ardo, San Lucas, San Antonio, Bradley and Bitterwater Tuley in supporting our local schools and voting Yes on Measure R.

/s/ Peter D. Anderson, Attorney

/s/ Richard A. Benson, Plumber/Business Owner

/s/ Raul C. Rodriguez, Business Manager

/s/ Michel Hardoy, Community Member

/s/ TJ Plew, CommunityMember 

 

— Monterey County Elections Dept.

Arguments AGAINST

Measure R is another attempt to get more money fora failing school system. Moreover, the students and the school get less than half of the money in this measure, most of it going to the bondholders and the bond company. But government schools are worse than just its attack on the people’s pocket book.

Historically, the concept of government-operated schools came to the forefront in the 1840s and employed racist arguments in its support. Immigrants were indoctrinated, Native American children taken from their parents and put into government schools, all tomake them standard, easily controlled citizens within a white-dominated culture.

Statists demand that all children be educated by the state because they believe that the State owns every child. John Swett, considered the father of state-operated educationin California, declared: “Children… belong, not to the parents, but to the State, to society, to the country.” Hitler proclaimed in 1933 that "Your child belongs to us already.” Joseph Goebbels echoed the same sentiment, remarking: “The youth belongs to us and we will yield them to no one.” The leaders of the Soviet Union stood for the same type of compulsory and collectivized education. As one American educator in the 1960s described it in Soviet Russia: “emphasis in education is not for the enrichment ofthe individual for the individual’s sake, but exclusively for the state’s sake.”

Government education is dangerous for a free and liberal society.  It is time to go back to the original non-government “public school” system where teachers were free to teach students, instead of being burdened with government-mandated measures that imposed conformity. Vote No on government ownership of education, students, and teachers. Vote NO on Measure R!  

/s/ Lawrence Samuels, Chair, Libertarian Party of Monterey County

/s/ Jane Heider, Secretary, Libertarian Party of Monterey County

 

— Monterey County Elections Dept.

Replies to Arguments FOR

      In California, the governmental school system not only spends recklessly, but the results are extremely poor, in a state with some of the highest school costs in the nation. 

      Such high costs might be appropriate, but only if school performance and student scoring were outstanding. But sadly, it isn’t even close. According to a San Jose-based Mercury News report in 2017, “an annual national report card [from Education Week] has rated the Golden State below mediocre —a solid C-minus, 10th from the bottom among the 50 states and Washington, D.C.” 

      Why would anybody keep rewarding taxpayers’ money to a system that fails decade after decade? What makes California’s low ranking even more depressing is that the California Department of Education continues to dumb down student tests. Although this race to the bottom needs to stop, there is no indication that more money will help, especially since students and schools get less than half of the proceeds from the 30-year tax bonds. In fact, most the taxpayer’s money goes directly to the bond company and bondholders, not the teachers, students or school. Why should taxpayers fund rich and powerful corporate bond companies?

      Education is too important to leave in the hands of politicians. The solution is to go back to the original concept of “public education” and return control of education to teachers and parents, and get rid of the middle man with a political axe to grind. Vote NO on R.

/s/ Lawrence Samuels, Chair, Libertarian Party of Monterey County

/s/ Jane Heider, Secretary, Libertarian Party of Monterey County

— Monterey County Elections Dept.

Replies to Arguments AGAINST

An Investment In Local Education and Our Communities Future

Our local economy is built upon the strength of its workforce and the quality of its education systems. Measure R will provide funds to upgrade aging schools and facilities to help train our students for meaningful, well-paying careers after high school including:

agriculture, 

public safety, 

computer science, 

engineering, 

information systems.

Measure R Does Not Increase Taxes

Measure R provides desperately needed revenue--without raising property owners current tax rate.

Measure R can only be used to build New School Facilities, Repair and Upgrade Old Ones

It's the law. All funds raised by Measure R must be spent on school facilities. If approved by the local voters, Measure R must be used to build new school facilities, repair and upgrade older classrooms, and laboratories. The money cannot be used for any other purpose.

Measure R Helps Protect Local Property Values

Opponents to Measure R seem motivated by fundamental anger towards the existence of public education. If you do not have school-age children, protecting the quality of our schools and the quality of life in our community is a wise investment that helps keep our property values strong.

When you see Greenfield and King City High School students going to school, think about the future were offering them. Then please do your part to repair and upgrade their schools, without raising your current tax rate.

Vote Yes on Measure R

/s/ Richard Benson, Business Owner

— Monterey County Elections Dept.

Read the proposed legislation

Proposed legislation

 

FULL TEXT BALLOT PROPOSITION
OF THE SOUTH MONTEREY COUNTY JOINT UNION HIGH SCHOOL DISTRICT
ACADEMIC AND VOCATIONAL CLASSROOM IMPROVEMENT
BOND MEASURE ELECTION NOVEMBER 6, 2018

The following is the full proposition presented to the voters by the South Monterey County Joint Union High School District.

South Monterey County Joint Union High School District Academic/Vocational Classroom Improvement Measure.  To upgrade academic, vocational/agriculture education classrooms, replace outdated science, technology/computer labs, provide classrooms for technology careers, remove hazardous materials like asbestos/lead paint, construct, acquire, repair classrooms, facilities/equipment, shall this South Monterey County Joint Union High School District measure authorizing $20,000,000 in bonds at legal rates, levying 2-cents/$100 assessed valuation, approximately $1,400,000 annually for local schools while bonds are outstanding, be adopted, requiring citizen oversight, audits, without increasing current tax rates?

 

PROJECT LIST

The Board of Trustees (“Board”) of the South Monterey County Joint Union High School District is committed to improving schools by upgrading or replacing deteriorating classrooms providing academic classrooms, and career pathways in technology, science and agriculture for all students.  To that end, the Board received input from teachers, staff and the community and evaluated the District’s urgent and critical facility needs, including the need for up-to-date technology, safety issues, class size reduction, computer and information technology in developing the types of projects to be funded by this measure, as such are described below. 

In approving this Project List, the Board of Trustees determines that the District MUST:

 (i)           Improve student, teacher and staff safety;

(ii)           Repair deteriorating classrooms;

(iii)         Replace or upgrade outdated science, technology classrooms and computer labs;

(iv)          Upgrade academic and vocational classrooms; and

(v)           Provide classrooms for careers in technology.

 

The Project List includes the following types of upgrades and improvements at the District’s several schools, facilities and sites including King City High School and Greenfield High School:

 

PROJECTS RELATED TO CLASSROOMS,

ACADEMICS AND VOCATIONAL STUDIES

 

Goals and Purposes:  Our schools are lacking the up-to-date technology students need to succeed, with many science classrooms and labs built in the 1950s.  These bond measure funds will upgrade classrooms, science labs, and computer labs, as well as improve electrical systems and wiring for computers and internet access, to ensure our students will have equal access to competitive 21st century learning.

Many of our local high schools’ classrooms and facilities were built more than 70 years ago and are in need of basic health and safety upgrades that will only be more expensive in the future.  These bond measure funds will be used to remove asbestos and lead paint, repair leaky roofs and deteriorating restrooms, and update fire alarm and sprinkler systems.

These measures will help our local high schools expand and improve their innovative career technical pathways programs.  These programs promote hands-on learning and help train young people for important careers after high school, including agriculture, public safety, computer science, engineering, and information systems.

             Repair deteriorating classrooms.

             Replace or upgrade outdated science, technology, and computer labs.

             Repair outdated and aging classrooms.

             Upgrade academic and vocational classrooms.

             Provide classrooms for careers in technology.

             Improve library technology and study space.

             Repair and upgrade agriculture education classrooms and labs.

             Replace outdated and aging classrooms.

 

* * *

The listed projects will be completed as needed.  Each project is assumed to include its share of furniture, equipment, architectural, engineering, and similar planning costs, program management, a customary contingency, and escalation for unforeseen design and construction costs.  In addition to the listed projects stated above, the Project List also includes the payment of the costs of preparation of all facility planning, facility assessment reviews and master plans, environmental studies, construction documentation, inspection and permit fees, and temporary housing of dislocated District activities caused by bond projects, as well as the refinancing of outstanding lease and loan obligations. The upgrading of technology infrastructure includes, but is not limited to, servers, switches, routers, modules, computers, district-wide computer labs upgrades, smart boards, cameras, sound projection systems, wiring classrooms for internet connectivity, wireless networks, wireless access points and controllers, portable interface devices, mobile device management systems, printers, upgraded voice-over-IP, phone systems, call manager and network security/firewall, and other miscellaneous equipment.  The repair and improvement of District school facilities and sites includes the following types of projects: install, acquire or repair energy efficiency improvements for school buildings, energy efficient lighting, air conditioning, heating, insulation and ceiling systems,  and windows; upgrade facilities for seismic safety; modernize solar arrays, HVAC systems; construct, upgrade, repair or install school site parking, campus and facility accessibility, utilities, plumbing, gas/ water lines, hard court surfaces, general site paving and curbing, tack boards, cabinets, tutoring rooms, restrooms, school cafeteria kitchens, roofs, interior and exterior lighting, flooring, roofs and tiles, interior and exterior lighting, doors, student lockers, water heaters, boilers, walkway covers and casework, bell/clock systems, signage, electronic marquees, asphalt, fire sensors, shade structures, outdated heating and air conditioning systems, elevators, play areas, locker rooms, fields, accessible bleachers and press box, concession areas,  facility lights, regulation and competitive tracks, practice and game fields and tracks, storage sheds, scoreboards, new gymnasiums/modernization thereof, auxiliary gyms,  multi-purpose rooms, other related facilities and upgrades; remove asbestos; renovate, upgrade classrooms, libraries, AG shop, auditoriums, child care facilities, and administration buildings, storage and operational and maintenance facilities; replace, upgrade and reconfigure parking lots and drop off/pick up zones to improve student safety; fill in gaps in the fences to protect students; make facility improvements for earthquake safety; upgrade electrical wiring and systems; renovate and paint interior and exterior building surfaces to extend their useful life; improve security, install safety, security and communication systems and equipment, windows and floor coverings (including tiles and carpeting); build or upgrade irrigation systems; upgrade school offices and District operations center, make improvements and acquire furnishings and/or other electronic equipment and systems. 

The budget for each project is an estimate and may be affected by factors beyond the District’s control.  Some projects throughout the District may be undertaken as joint use projects in cooperation with other local public or non-profit agencies.  The final cost of each project will be determined as plans are finalized, construction bids are awarded and projects are completed.  Based on the final costs of each project, certain of the projects described above may be delayed or may not be completed.  Demolition of existing facilities and reconstruction of facilities scheduled for repair and upgrade may occur, if the Board determines that such an approach would be more cost-effective in creating enhanced and operationally efficient campuses. Necessary site preparation/restoration and landscaping, may occur in connection with new construction, renovation or remodeling, or installation or removal of relocatable classrooms, including ingress and egress, removing, replacing, or installing irrigation, utility lines, trees and landscaping, redirecting fire access, and acquiring any necessary easements, licenses, or rights of way to the property. 

Bond proceeds shall be expended only for the specific purposes identified herein.  Proceeds of the bonds may be used to pay or reimburse the District for the cost of District staff when performing work on or necessary and incidental to the bond projects.  The District shall create an account into which proceeds of the bonds shall be deposited and comply with the reporting requirements of Government Code § 53410. 

FISCAL ACCOUNTABILITY:  IN ACCORDANCE WITH EDUCATION CODE SECTION 15272, THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES WILL APPOINT A CITIZENS’ OVERSIGHT COMMITTEE AND CONDUCT ANNUAL INDEPENDENT AUDITS TO ASSURE THAT FUNDS ARE SPENT ONLY ON DISTRICT PROJECTS AND FOR NO OTHER PURPOSE. THE EXPENDITURE OF BOND MONEY ON THESE PROJECTS IS SUBJECT TO STRINGENT FINANCIAL ACCOUNTABILITY REQUIREMENTS.  BY LAW, PERFORMANCE AND FINANCIAL AUDITS WILL BE PERFORMED ANNUALLY, AND ALL BOND EXPENDITURES WILL BE MONITORED BY AN INDEPENDENT CITIZENS’ OVERSIGHT COMMITTEE TO ENSURE THAT FUNDS ARE SPENT AS PROMISED AND SPECIFIED.  THE CITIZENS’ OVERSIGHT COMMITTEE MUST INCLUDE, AMONG OTHERS, REPRESENTATION OF A BONA FIDE TAXPAYERS ASSOCIATION, A BUSINESS ORGANIZATION AND A SENIOR CITIZENS ORGANIZATION AND WILL INCLUDE PARENTS OF STUDENTS FROM EACH OF THE DISTRICT’S LEARNING COMMUNITIES.  NO DISTRICT EMPLOYEES OR VENDORS ARE ALLOWED TO SERVE ON THE CITIZENS’ OVERSIGHT COMMITTEE.

No Administrator Salaries:  Proceeds from the sale of the bonds authorized by this proposition shall be used only for the acquisition, construction, reconstruction, rehabilitation, or replacement of school facilities, including the furnishing and equipping of school facilities, and not for any other purpose, including teacher and school administrator salaries and other operating expenses.  Bond funds shall not be temporarily transferred to the District’s general fund for administrative purposes.

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