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November 6, 2018 — California General Election
Local

City of Monterey
Measure S Ordinance - 2/3 Approval Required

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Election Results

Passing

8,669 votes yes (82.09%)

1,892 votes no (17.91%)

Continuation of Street Infrastructure Rehabilitation Tax
— undefined

Continuation of Street Infrastructure Rehabilitation Tax. Without increasing the existing one cent per dollar transaction and use ("sales") tax, shall the measure be adopted to continue the tax for eight years to fix streets, sidewalks, and potholes; improve access and safety for senior citizens, disabled residents, and others; and repair the storm drain system to protect our beaches/Monterey Bay, with all revenue exclusively applied to these specific purposes, subject to citizen oversight and independent audits?

What is this proposal?

Measure Details — Official information about this measure

YES vote means

A “Yes” vote is a vote to continue the 1% sales tax for eight years, to be used exclusively for the rehabilitation, repair, and improvement of the City’s streets, sidewalks, storm drains, and ADA improvements, with a citizen Oversight Committee and annual independent audits.

NO vote means

A “No” vote is a vote not to extend the existing tax and the existing tax would no longer be collected after March 31, 2019.

Impartial analysis / Proposal

Monterey County Elections Dept.

The City Council of the City of Monterey voted unanimously to place Measure S on the ballot to ask voters to continue, without increasing, the existing special tax for the rehabilitation, repair, and improvement of the City of Monterey’s streets, sidewalks, and storm drains, and Americans with Disabilities Act (“ADA”) improvements (for example, curb ramps), for an additional eight years.   

The current sales tax was initially approved by the voters in 2014, and it authorizes a one-cent per dollar (1%) transactions and use (“sales”) tax. The authority for the sales tax is set to expire on March 31, 2019 unless it is extended by the voters.  

Measure S would authorize continuing the special tax for another eight years without increasing the rate.  

As a special tax, use of the funds collected from Measure S is restricted to the rehabilitation, repair, and improvement of the City of Monterey’s streets, sidewalks, and storm drains, and ADA improvements, such as curb ramps. The tax may not be used for any other purpose.  The tax will automatically end in eight years after collection begins, unless extended by the voters. 

State and local sales tax on retail sales in the City of Monterey is currently 8.75% of the purchase price, which includes the 1% sales tax that is the subject of this extension.  Of this, the City of Monterey receives 2% of the revenue.  Funds generated from the continuation of the 1% sales tax proposed by Measure S would only go to the City, and not to the State or any other governmental entity. It is estimated that the tax would raise $9.5 million annually for the City.  

A “Yes” vote is a vote to continue the 1% sales tax for eight years, to be used exclusively for the rehabilitation, repair, and improvement of the City’s streets, sidewalks, storm drains, and ADA improvements, with a citizen Oversight Committee and annual independent audits.  A “No” vote is a vote not to extend the existing tax and the existing tax would no longer be collected after March 31, 2019.  Measure S will be approved if two-thirds of voters vote “yes” on the measure.   

A full copy of the ordinance is printed in these ballot materials.   

/s/ M. Christine Davi                  August 7, 2018 

Monterey City Attorney 

 

Published Arguments — Arguments for and against the ballot measure

Arguments FOR

We've accomplished a lot. Let’s finish the job with no increase in taxes. Extending the measure will give Monterey residents the streets, sidewalks, and storm drains they deserve.

Without your vote, 71 percent of our streets will remain to be fixed. These are in the poorest condition and require total reconstruction. Funding will end, and street conditions will begin to again decline.

Measure P was approved by a large majority of voters in November,2014. The 1% sales tax was used "to address significant deferred maintenance by fixing streets, sidewalks, and potholes; improving access and safety; and repairing our 100-year-old storm drain system.”

Delaying maintenance and repairs will only increase costs in the long run. Delays will only make repairs more costly. More than 80% of street repairs will be done in residential neighborhoods while nearly half the cost is by non-residents.

The original Measure P was for four years so the City could demonstrate that it would faithfully manage the funds and Measure P construction. The City is on track to achieve the 4-year goal to improve "poor" paving conditions to "fair".

Extending funding at the current rate will allow us to get City streets to a "good" or "very good" condition and to keep them in "good" to "very good" condition. All funds shall be deposited into a special fund and used only to repair streets, sidewalks, and storm drains.

An independent citizen’s oversight committee has done an annual auditand regular reports to the community and has praised the city for a job well-done. The city is on track to meet the initial 4 year goal, 2015 to 2019, as approved by the voters.

Let’s take care of our special, historic, scenic city. Let’s finish the job.

/s/ Clyde W. Roberson, Mayor

/s/ Ed Smith, City Council Member

/s/ Carol Chorbajian, Chair, BMAC

/s/ Pamela Hansman, Member Ballot AdvisorCommittee

/s/ Rick Heuer, Pres. Monterey Peninsula Taxpayers Assn.

 

— Monterey County Elections Dept.

Arguments AGAINST

No arguments against were submitted.

— Monterey County Elections Dept.

Read the proposed legislation

Proposed legislation

ORDINANCE NO. 3581 C.S.

AN ORDINANCE OF THE COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF MONTEREY

 

AMENDING ARTICLE 7 OF CHAPTER 35 TO THE MONTEREY CITY CODE TO CONTINUE THE STREET INFRASTRUCTURE REHABILITATION TRANSACTIONS AND USE TAX SUBJECT TO THE APPROVAL OF THE VOTERS AND ADMINISTERED BY THE CALIFORNIA DEPARTMENT OF TAX AND FEE ADMINISTRATION

 

THE COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF MONTEREY DOES ORDAIN, as follows:

 

              Section 1.      FINDINGS.

 

A.            In order to address Monterey’s essential infrastructure needs including the repair of deteriorating streets, sidewalks, and storm drains, the City of Monterey deemed it necessary and essential to submit the question of a special one cent per dollar transactions and use (“sales”) tax for essential infrastructure needs to qualified voters within the city at an election held on November 4, 2014.  

 

B.             The voters of the City of Monterey overwhelmingly approved the Street Infrastructure Rehabilitation Transactions and Use Tax (Measure P), with 74.34% of Monterey residents voting in favor of the measure.  

 

C.            With funding from the Street Infrastructure Rehabilitation tax, the City has: repaired 491 street segments (blocks), and an additional 49 street segments are currently under construction; made $1.6 million in sidewalk repairs; and made upgrades to 48 storm drain pipes that had been rated the worst in the system.

 

D.            This funding for critical repairs to streets, sidewalks, and storm drains will expire on March 31, 2019 if the voters of the City of Monterey do not approve a continuation of the tax. 

 

E.             Without the continuation of the one cent per dollar revenue measure, the City of Monterey will not be able to adequately maintain basic infrastructure necessary for street and sidewalk repairs that contribute to a safe community. Without the continuation of the revenue measure, the City of Monterey will face inadequate funding for essential infrastructure needs to repair deteriorating streets, sidewalks, and storm drains. The cost to bring the street network into a state of good repair is estimated between 60 and 70 million dollars.  This investment should raise the pavement condition index (PCI), an industry standard method of evaluating pavement condition, to a rating of 83. The investment of the previous measure brought the PCI to 67.  If this measure does not pass, the progress that was made will be lost and the city will see the PCI begin to fall.  

 

F.             If the revenue measure is continued, the City will be able to address remaining street repair deferred maintenance and would allow important pedestrian safety improvements to signalized intersections. Sidewalks would continue to be repaired and additional storm drain work could be performed, such as replacing the Lake El Estero Storm Water Pump station. 

 

G.            All funds collected by this tax will continue to be deposited into a special fund and expended only to repair and rehabilitate the City’s streets, sidewalks, and sewers. All funds from this local revenue measure are required to stay in the City of Monterey and cannot be taken by the State.  Fiscal accountability will be ensured by requiring independent citizens’ oversight, an annual independent financial/performance audit, and yearly reports to the community.

 

H.            The City of Monterey determined that the proposed action is not a project as defined by the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA)(CCR, Title 14, Chapter 3 (“CEQA Guidelines), Article 20, Section 15378).  In addition, CEQA Guidelines Section 15061 includes the general rule that CEQA applies only to activities which have the potential for causing a significant effect on the environment.  Where it can be seen with certainty that there is no possibility that the activity in question may have a significant effect on the environment, the activity is not subject to CEQA.  Because the proposed action and this matter have no potential to cause any effect on the environment, or because it falls within a category of activities excluded as projects pursuant to CEQA Guidelines Section 15378, this matter is not a project.  Because the matter does not cause a direct or any reasonably foreseeable indirect physical change on or in the environment, this matter is not a project.  Any subsequent discretionary street infrastructure rehabilitation projects that may be funded using sales tax revenue received from the referenced special transactions and use tax resulting from this action will be assessed for CEQA applicability.  Lastly, CEQA Guidelines Section 15378 (b) (4) specifically states that the creation of government funding mechanisms or other government fiscal activities which do not involve any commitment to any specific project as ‘not a project.’  

              

      Section 2.      AUTHORITY.  The City Council enacts this ordinance in accordance with the authority granted to cities by Article XI, Section 7, of the California Constitution. 

 

      Section 3.      AMENDMENT OF THE MONTEREY CITY CODE.  Monterey City Code Chapter 35, Article 7, Section 86 is amended to read:

 

Termination Date. The authority to levy the tax imposed by this ordinance shall expire on March 31, 2027, unless extended by a two thirds majority vote of the voters of the City.

 

       Section 4      CODIFICATION.  Upon adoption of this ordinance pursuant to the voter approval referenced herein, the City Clerk, in consultation with the City Attorney, is hereby authorized and directed to codify this ordinance in the Monterey City Code. 

 

      Section 5       EFFECTIVE DATE.  If this ordinance is approved by two thirds of the voters voting on the issue at the November 6, 2018 election, pursuant to Elections Code section 9217, this ordinance shall become effective ten (10) days after the City Council declares the results of the election.  

                              

              PASSED AND ADOPTED BY THE COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF MONTEREY this 17th day of July, 2018, by the following vote:

 

AYES:                    5              COUNCILMEMBERS:          Albert, Barrett, Haffa, Smith, Roberson

NOES:                   0              COUNCILMEMBERS:          None

ABSENT:              0              COUNCILMEMBERS:          None

ABSTAIN:             0              COUNCILMEMBERS:          None

                              

                                                                                              APPROVED:

ATTEST:

                                                                                              

/s/ Mayor

 

/s/ City Clerk 

             

More information

News (1)

Measure S Information — September 11, 2018 Monterey Herald
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