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November 6, 2018 — California General Election
Local

City of San Diego
Measure G Initiative from the People - Majority Approval Required

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Election Results

Passed

252,839 votes yes (54.5%)

211,390 votes no (45.5%)

100% of precincts reporting (813/813).

497,613 ballots counted.

Mission Valley Stadium - SDSU West Initiative
— undefined

MISSION VALLEY STADIUM - SDSU WEST INITIATIVE: Shall the City sell Mission Valley stadium property to San Diego State University or any SDSU auxiliary organization, entity, or affiliate, consistent with price, terms, and conditions described in the measure, to allow the California State University Board of Trustees to determine its development, which may include stadium, recreational, educational, residential, office, hotel, retail, and other uses; and if sold, shall the City set aside adjacent land for a river park?

What is this proposal?

Measure Details — Official information about this measure

Summary

Office of The City Attorney, City of San Diego

OFFICIAL TITLE AND SUMMARY

BALLOT TITLE

SDSU West Citizens’ Initiative

BALLOT SUMMARY

This citizens’ initiative measure provides for the sale of approximately 132 acres of property owned by the City of San Diego, including the Mission Valley stadium, to San Diego State University (SDSU) or any SDSU auxiliary organization, entity, or affiliate. Contingent upon certain approvals, the property would be redeveloped, including demolishing the existing stadium and building a new stadium. This measure is proposed by private individuals and does not bind SDSU, a California State University.

If approved by voters, this measure would amend the San Diego Municipal Code to establish a process for the City to sell the property to SDSU or the other listed entities. This measure includes terms and conditions the sale must meet. The sale would not be subject to existing Municipal Code provisions regarding the sale of City property.

The sale would be at the price and terms the City Council deems fair and equitable and in the public interest, to be determined at a public meeting. The sale price must be based on the value of the property as of October 9, 2017. The measure includes several factors the City Council may consider in determining that value.

This measure states that the sale shall provide for development of various educational, residential, commercial, and recreational uses, including a joint use stadium and a river park. If the property is sold, the City would not be responsible for the costs of demolishing the stadium or building a new stadium.

The land specified for the location of a river park would not be sold as part of this measure. The measure does not specify who would pay for, develop, build, or maintain a river park. The measure would prohibit the use of the City’s General Fund to pay for the development of the river park, but does not prevent other types of City funds from being used.

Potential uses of the property include:

*  a new joint use stadium with approximately 35,000 seats;
*  public trails and open space;
*  recreation space and parks;
*  practice and recreation fields; and facilities for educational, research, entrepreneurial and technology programs constructed in phases and comprised of:
  • academic and administrative buildings and classrooms;
  • commercial, technology, and office space;
  • retail uses;
  • hotels;
  • faculty and staff housing;
  • graduate and undergraduate student housing;
  • apartment-style homes for the local community;
  • other market-rate, workforce and affordable homes; and
  • trolley and other public transportation uses and improvements.

If the property is sold, the specific development would be planned through an SDSU Campus Master Plan revision process. This process would include:

*  preparation of a Campus Master Plan revision;
*  review required by the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA), including
*  opportunities for public review and input; and *  approval by the Board of Trustees of the California State University.   This measure may not be amended for 20 years after its adoption without a vote of the people.

Impartial analysis / Proposal

Office of The City Attorney, City of San Diego

CITY ATTORNEY’S IMPARTIAL ANALYSIS

This citizens’ initiative measure was placed on the ballot by the City Council after voter signatures qualified the initiative measure for the ballot.

If approved by voters, this measure would allow the sale of approximately 132 acres of Mission Valley stadium property to San Diego State University (SDSU) or any SDSU auxiliary organization, entity, or affiliate, which could include a non-governmental entity or a private party. Voter approval of this measure does not guarantee that the property would be sold or that any specific development would be built.

If the property is sold to SDSU, the Board of Trustees of the California State University will determine the use of the property in its sole discretion through a Campus Master Plan revision process. A Campus Master Plan revision does not require City approval. The City’s development regulations would not apply to development by SDSU, regardless of the terms of this measure. It is unclear whether the City’s development regulations would apply if SDSU is not the purchaser.

The final development plan for the property will not be known until:

  • the Campus Master Plan revision process is complete;

  • California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) review has been performed; and

  • the Board of Trustees of the California State University grants its approval.

These steps would occur after the sale.

This measure states that the sale shall provide for development of various educational, residential, commercial, and recreational uses. The measure does not address how the sale would provide for that development. A sale agreement may create requirements related to development, which must be consistent with state laws and the terms of this measure. The terms of a final sale agreement will not be known until after the election, when a purchaser is identified and a sale agreement is negotiated.

The sale must allow the purchaser to lease, sell, or exchange any portion of the property to an entity or affiliate as part of a SDSU-private partnership or arrangement, or to an SDSU auxiliary organization. The purchaser will determine whether the property or a portion of it will be sold to another party or parties.

Existing law allows the City to sell property to a public agency for public purposes on terms the City Council deems fair and equitable and in the public interest. This measure would change existing law to require the City to sell the property to a particular public entity or private party under specific terms, if certain conditions are met. CEQA review is not legally required before a citizens’ initiative measure may be approved by voters.

This measure may not be amended for 20 years after its adoption without a vote of the people. Once the property is sold, the terms of the sale agreement could not be changed by a public vote.

Financial effect

Office of The City Attorney, City of San Diego

FISCAL IMPACT ANALYSIS

This measure requires the City to sell the SDCCU Stadium site (property) to San Diego State University (SDSU) or an SDSU auxiliary organization, entity, or affiliate (purchaser) upon City Council approval if certain conditions are met. The purchaser would be anticipated to demolish SDCCU stadium and build a 35,000 seat stadium at its expense. After additional permitting, environmental review, and SDSU’s completion of a SDSU Campus Master Plan revision, the purchaser would be anticipated to build an unspecified amount of parks, academic buildings and student housing, and other office, retail, residential, and hotel space. The measure provides for construction of a 34-acre river park, but does not specify who would build the park or identify costs and funding sources for the park.

This measure has direct and indirect fiscal impacts. However, those impacts cannot be precisely quantified, as the measure requires future negotiations, and development of the property is subject to many external factors.

Direct fiscal impacts include the sale price of the property. The measure requires the sale price to be based on fair market value as of October 2017, but the price could be adjusted to account for stadium demolition costs, environmental requirements, the cost to develop a river park, and other factors. In June 2017, the property’s appraised value was identified as $73.8 million. The precise sale price is subject to future negotiation and is currently unknown. A portion of sale revenue would go to the City’s Public Utilities Department, which owns a portion of the property.

Other potential direct impacts include City staff time and resources to permit and approve developments, remediate environmental contamination, and to build, operate, and maintain the river park. The measure does not specify who will build the river park or any funding for the river park. It does not allow the City’s General Fund to fund the river park, but it does not prohibit any other funding source – from the City or any other party – from being used. Additional infrastructure and utilities upgrades may also be required for development of the properties.

Indirect fiscal impacts include expenses and revenues from new economic activity associated with development of the property. City expenditures to provide service associated with development could be necessary, but as the measure does not specify the precise nature of future development it is not possible to precisely quantify potential expenses and revenues associated with future development. Developments of SDSU facilities (academic and administration buildings, student housing, etc) would not be subject to property tax. Development of other retail or office space, or other residential developments, could be subject to property tax. Full development of the property would not be complete for several years and would depend on many factors outside the City’s control.

Approval of this measure precludes the City from using the property for other purposes, soliciting proposals to redevelop the property, or otherwise marketing the property for sale or lease. This could also have an unquantifiable fiscal impact.

Published Arguments — Arguments for and against the ballot measure

Arguments FOR

ARGUMENT IN FAVOR OF MEASURE G

Measure G -- the SDSU West Initiative – authorizes the Mayor and City Council to sell the Mission Valley stadium site to San Diego State University at fair market value for much-needed campus expansion, a research center, housing, multi-use stadium and public river park.

  • Provides a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to meet the higher education needs of local students, enabling SDSU to accept more of the nearly 100,000 undergraduate applicants annually.

  • SDSU’s plan includes nearly 90 acres of parkland, habitat and open space, including a publicly accessible San Diego River Park, which is one reason why the Sierra Club and other environmental organizations endorse Measure G.

  • Delivers student, faculty, staff, affordable, workforce and market rate housing to help meet ourregion’s critical housing needs.

  • SDSU’s plan guarantees a transparent planning process that complies with the California Environmental Quality Act, mitigates project impacts, includes public input, and generates 40,000 fewer vehicle trips per day than SANDAG projected for the competing SoccerCity plan.

  • Includes a research park to increase collaboration between education, entrepreneurship, and high-tech business to support SDSU’s role as a leading research university and expand its $5.67 billion annual economic impact on our economy.

  • Ensures redevelopment of the stadium property will be in the hands of proven developmentexperts, taking advantage of SDSU’s extensive experience and success in managing over $482 million in campus development since 2013, including housing, retail and academic projects, many involving public-private partnerships.

  • Provides a permanent home for SDSU football and other athletics, professional soccer and football, in a state-of-the-art multi-use stadium – at no cost to taxpayers – and relieves taxpayers of continuing maintenance costs for the former Qualcomm Stadium.

  • Produces thousands of high quality jobs, expanding the University’s current employment impact of more than 40,000.

  • Generates significant state and local tax revenues, increasing the more than $457 million produced annually by SDSU.

www.SDSUWest.com

Adam Day, Chair
California State University

Sally Roush, Immediate Past President
San Diego State University Board of Trustees

Jerry Sanders, President and CEO
San Diego Regional
Chamber of Commerce 

Jesse Conner, President
San Diego City Firefighters L145

Dr. Peter A. Anderson, Chairperson
Sierra Club San Diego 

— San Diego County Registrar of Voters

Arguments AGAINST

ARGUMENT AGAINST MEASURE G

Vote NO on Measure G – A Bad Deal for Taxpayers

Measure G costs taxpayers hundreds of millions of dollars, deprives K-12 schools of needed funding and provides no guaranteed public benefits.

Measure G is a bait & switch benefitting developers. It quietly allows well- connected private developers — not SDSU — to develop the land.

Measure G does not expand the campus, it allows private developers to build office parks and condos. Officials admit a campus expansion could take decades.

Measure G is a terrible deal for taxpayers. The independent San Diego County Taxpayers Association reports Measure G is $208 million worse for City taxpayers than the other plan, Measure E. Almost certainly worse for the schools.

Measure G continues the massive stadium subsidy on the Mission Valley site, despite the City’s mounting budget deficits. The City recently gave the current stadium almost $1 million per football game in subsidies that will likely continue for years if Measure G passes.

Measure G gives well-connected developers a tax loophole to pay less than their fair share of property taxes. That’s less money for San Diego neighborhoods and K-12 schools, but more money for a few well-connected private developers.

Measure G puts students at risk for hundreds of millions of dollars in risky debt. If the private development isn’t financially successful — by mismanagement or another financial crisis — SDSU must make up for thedevelopment’s failure and student fees are a key source of new revenue.

Measure G provides a blank check giveaway to the well-connected developers who crafted the initiative. They’re not required to pay fair market value for the land, as determined by the City’s official independent appraisal. A great deal for them; terrible deal for you.

Get the facts: NoOnMeasureG.com

Protect Taxpayers and Schools – Vote No on Measure G

Scott Sherman
San Diego City Councilmember

April Boling
Taxpayer Advocate

— San Diego County Registrar of Voters

Read the proposed legislation

Proposed legislation

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Due to this measure's length, and to the fact that it includes a map that the Voter's Edge technology limitations won't allow us to reproduce, we invite you to consult this 14-page PDF of the full text https://daks2k3a4ib2z.cloudfront.net/59cc815901fe980001f8ec47/59ceb473219791000175c037_FinalVersionInitiative.pdf

You may also read the full text of the measure in this PDF of a sample ballot published by the San Diego County Registrar of Voters: http://www2.sdcounty.ca.gov/rov/Sample_Ballots/Eng/SB-ENG-400.pdf 

To find your own sample ballot version, containing all the candidates and measures on your own ballot, please use the ROV's sample ballot look-up tool at https://www2.sdcounty.ca.gov/rov/Eng/ballot.asp .

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Who supports or opposes this measure?

Yes on Measure G

Organizations (1)

Elected & Appointed Officials (0)
No on Measure G
Organizations (0)
Elected & Appointed Officials (0)

More information

News (6)

The Mission Valley stadium ballot measures explained — October 14, 2018 San Diego Union-Tribune
SDSU West beats SoccerCity in new poll — October 14, 2018 San Diego Union-Tribune
SDSU to SoccerCity: Stop confusing our students — September 24, 2018 San Diego Union-Tribune
Stadium initiative TV ads: Fact or fiction? — September 23, 2018 San Diego Union Tribune

Contact Info

Yes on Measure G
Friends of SDSU, Yes on G, No on E
No on Measure G
GOAL San Diego: Yes on E, No on G
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