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Voter’s Edge California
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League of Women Voters of California Education Fund
KPBS Voters Guide@KPBSNews
November 8, 2016 — Elección General de California
Distrito especial

Shasta - Tehama - Trinity Joint Community College District
Measure H - 55% Approval Required

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Resultados electorales

Se aprueba

55,167 votos si (55.8%)

43,615 votos no (44.2%)

100% de distritos activos (166/166).

129,452 boletas electorales serán contadas.

Shasta College Job Training/Veteran Support Measure
— undefined

To improve college classrooms and facilities providing education and job training opportunities for students, local residents/ veterans, renovate and expand science, technology, engineering and math labs, training facilities and programs for fire, law enforcement, emergency medical, welding, manufacturing/automotive jobs, upgrade electrical systems, acquire, construct/repair classrooms, facilities, sites/equipment, shall Shasta-Tehama-Trinity Joint Community College District issue $139,000,000 in bonds at legal rates, requiring citizens' oversight, independent audits, all funds used locally?"

¿Qué es esta propuesta?

Información básica sobre la iniciativa de ley — Información oficial sobre esta iniciativa

Published Arguments — Arguments for and against the ballot measure

Leer la legislación propuesta

Legislación propuesta

 

H

Shasta – Tehama – Trinity Joint Community College District

 

Ballot question

“SHASTA COLLEGE JOB TRAINING/ VETERAN SUPPORT MEASURE.  To improve college classrooms and facilities providing education and job training opportunities for students, local residents/ veterans, renovate and expand science, technology, engineering and math labs, training facilities and programs for fire, law enforcement, emergency medical, welding, manufacturing/automotive jobs, upgrade electrical systems, acquire, construct/repair classrooms, facilities, sites/equipment, shall Shasta-Tehama-Trinity Joint Community College District issue $139,000,000 in bonds at legal rates, requiring citizens’ oversight, independent audits, all funds used locally?”

 

What your vote means

YES

NO

 

A “yes” vote is to authorize the issuance of the bonds.

 

 

A “no” vote is against authorizing the issuance of the bonds.

 

 

For and against Measure H

FOR

AGAINST

Patrick M. Frost                                                      Resource Conservation Dist. Mgr., Retired                 Ramona L. Quenelle                                               Veteran/Shasta College Graduate                                  Missy McArthur                                                          Mayor, City of Redding                                                        Christine Thompson                                                   Chief, CAL FIRE/Tehama County Fire                          Kendall S. Pierson                                                     Shasta College Board President

Russell K. Hunt
Accountant

 

 


Arguments and replies are the opinions of the authors. We print them exactly as submitted, including errors.

Argument for Measure H

Rebuttal

Reply to Argument for Measure H

Shasta College is an important asset to our North State communities and should be a top priority.  A quality college is important because it provides training and education for better paying jobs, is good for the local economy, and improves the quality of our community.  Our professors and staff do a great job educating local students, but many classrooms and facilities in the Shasta-Tehama-Trinity Joint Community College District are outdated or inadequate to provide students with the facilities they need to succeed.

Although classrooms, labs, and facilities have been well maintained over the years, aging buildings must be upgraded since many do not meet 21st century standards.  Our main campus, Shasta College, has classrooms that are over 50 years old.  By investing in Shasta College, we can meet today’s technological and educational standards and provide better job-training services to improve our communities for years to come.

If passed, Measure H will provide funding for critical facility improvements to our campuses including:

Increasing education and job training opportunities for Veterans and military.

Constructing a new training facility for welding, manufacturing and automotive jobs.

Providing new science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) labs.

Constructing a Regional Public Safety Training Center to provide programs for fire, law enforcement, paramedic, and EMT.

Upgrading technology infrastructure and old, inadequate electrical systems.

Measure H makes financial sense and protects taxpayers:

By law, spending must be reviewed and annually audited by an independent citizens' oversight committee.

All bond funds must be spent locally and cannot be taken by the State.

Funds are required to be spent only on local college facilities, not for administrator salaries or pensions.

Measure H upgrades and renovates old and inadequate buildings to provide training and education for better paying jobs. That's something we can all support. Please join us and VOTE YES ON MEASURE H!

/s/ Patrick M. Frost, Resource Conservation Dist. Mgr., Retired                 /s/ Ramona L. Quenelle, Veteran/Shasta College Graduate                                  /s/ Missy McArthur, Mayor, City of Redding                                                        /s/ Christine Thompson, Chief, CAL FIRE/Tehama County Fire                          /s/ Kendall S. Pierson, Shasta College Board President

 

No reply to the Argument for Measure H was submitted.

 

 

 

 

 

Arguments and replies are the opinions of the authors. We print them exactly as submitted, including errors.

Argument against Measure H

Rebuttal

Reply to Argument against Measure H

This is a very misguided approach at deception. Shasta College has already remodeled the science and engineering labs with the last bond measure. Shasta College already has facilities for training public safety candidates. The college already has a veterans’ support center. And there are already shops for advanced manufacturing, automotive, welding and computer science. If you doubt this, walk around the campus. So what if the buildings are 50 years . Cement lasts along time. The language of the measure implies these are new programs. They are not.

This is redecorating so administrators can attach it to their resumes and move up to better paying jobs somewhere else. The Citizens Oversight Committee is a worthless aside as they place their pals on the committee. We saw this when decisions where not made quickly, estimates where wrong and promises not kept on the last school bond. Remember we were supposed to get 24 bachelors programs. Never happened.

The language of the measure is written vaguely enough, on purpose, so that routine maintenance  and replacement can be shifted over to use the bond money. This frees up funds for pay increases and concerts and whatever the administration wants to do. It is a trend throughout education.

/s/ Russell K. Hunt                                                             Accountant

Shasta College is a vital institution to north state residents providing opportunities for higher education, better paying jobs, and career training and employment.  Don't be misled by inaccurate arguments against Measure H.

 

CONSIDER THE FACTS:

FACT - Residents will benefit from new and improved facilities and programs for welding, manufacturing and automotive jobs, science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) labs, improved support for Veterans and current military, and a Regional Public Safety Training Center to provide programs for fire, law enforcement, paramedic, and EMT.

FACT - Most of the facilities at Shasta College are approaching 50 years of age.  After so much time, roofs leak, plumbing deteriorates, electrical systems malfunction, and classrooms and labs become outdated and antiquated.  We need to upgrade our 1960’s facilities to prepare students for 21st Century jobs.

FACT - Strict taxpayer safeguards are in place. By law, spending must be audited annually and reviewed by an independent citizens' oversight committee.

FACT - Measure H keeps our tax dollars in our local community and out of Sacramento. 

Measure H is a carefully considered program that will improve the quality of education, provide better paying jobs for north state residents, and strengthen the economy of our community. 

Join us and Vote YES on Measure H!

/s/ Rhonda E. Nehr                                                             Shasta College Board Vice President

/s/ Dr. Rob Lydon                                                                  Shasta College Trustee/Veterinarian

/s/ Michael R. Hebrard                                                       VP, Fire Chief’s Assn. of Shasta County

/s/ Missy McArthur                                                              Mayor, City of Redding

/s/ Dr. Joe Wyse                                                                      Shasta College Superintendent/President

 

Impartial analysis of Measure H

By County Counsel of the bond measure submitted by the Shasta – Tehama – Trinity Joint Community College District

 

This analysis of the general obligation bond measure for the Shasta-Tehama-Trinity Joint Community College District (“District”), Measure H, is prepared and submitted to the voters in accordance with Elections Code section 9500, et seq.  The electors who will be entitled to vote on the measure are those qualified electors who reside within the boundaries of the District.  If approved, the issuance of the bonds will be in conformance with the laws of the State of California.  Measure H does not propose to amend or add to existing law.

 

Section 1 of Article XIIIA and section 18 of Article XVI of the California Constitution and Education Code sections 15264 et seq. authorize a community college district to adopt a proposal, subject to the approval of the District’s voters, authorizing the issuance of general obligation bonds for specific community college purposes.  The District’s Board of Trustees has adopted such a proposal and is submitting it to the District electors for their consideration.

 

If fifty-five percent (55%) of the qualified electors voting on Measure H vote for approval, the District’s Board of Trustees would be authorized to issue bonds in the principal amount not to exceed $139,000,000 and to levy ad valorem taxes on taxable property within the District to pay for the amount of bonded indebtedness plus interest.  The interest rate on the bonds would not exceed the statutory limit.

 

The projects to be financed by the bonds may include: (1) repairing, upgrading, or replacing infrastructure, classrooms, equipment, and facilities as described in the full text of the measure (the “Full Text”); (2) upgrading mechanical systems; (3) improving information technology infrastructure and systems; (4) improving safety, disabled access, emergency preparedness, and security systems; (5) other projects listed in the Full Text; (6) refinancing outstanding lease obligations; and (7) expenses associated with the foregoing purposes as described in the Full Text.  The proceeds will not be used for any purpose not identified in the measure, including teacher or administrator salaries or be taken by the state.  The District's Board of Trustees shall establish a citizen's oversight committee to ensure that the proceeds of the bonds are spent only on the projects and sites identified in Measure H.

 

According to the tax rate statement submitted by Dr. Joe Wyse, Superintendent/President of the Shasta-Tehama-Trinity Joint Community College District, the average estimated ad valorem tax which would be required to be levied on taxable real property to repay the bonds over their term would be $19.00 per year for property having an assessed value of $100,000.  These calculations, however, are estimates only and are not binding upon the District.

 

If Measure H is not approved by fifty-five percent (55%) of the qualified electors voting on the measure, the District will not be authorized to issue bonds for the aforementioned purposes.

 

A “yes” vote is to authorize the issuance of the bonds.

 

A “no” vote is against authorizing the issuance of the bonds.

 

/s/ RUBIN E. CRUSE, JR.                                                                                                                                                                                                              County Counsel

  Tax Rate Statement Measure H

 

An election will be held in the Shasta-Tehama-Trinity Joint Community College District (the "District") on November 8, 2016 to authorize the sale of up to $139,000,000 in general obligation bonds. The following information is submitted in compliance with Sections 9400-9404 of the California Elections Code.

1.  The best estimate of the tax rate that would be required to fund this bond issue during the first fiscal year after the sale of the first series of bonds, based on estimated assessed valuations available at the time of filing of this statement, is $.01900 per $100 ($19.00 per $100,000) of assessed valuation in fiscal year 2017-18.

2.  The best estimate of the tax rate that would be required to fund this bond issue during the first fiscal year after the sale of the last series of bonds, based on estimated assessed valuations available at the time of filing of this statement, is $.01900 per $100 ($19.00 per $100,000) of assessed valuation in fiscal year 2026-27.

3.  The best estimate of the highest tax rate that would be required to fund this bond issue, based on estimated assessed valuations available at the time of filing this statement, is $.01900 per $100 ($19.00 per $100,000) of assessed valuation.  This vote is projected to apply in each fiscal year that the bonds are outstanding.

4.  The best estimate from official sources of the total debt service, including the principal and interest, that would be required to be repaid if all the bonds are issued and sold will be approximately $240,900,000.

These estimates are based on projections derived from information obtained from official sources. The actual tax rates and the years in which they will apply may vary depending on the timing of bond sales, the amount of bonds sold at each sale and actual increases in assessed valuations. The timing of the bond sales and the amount of bonds sold at any given time will be determined by the needs of the District. Actual assessed valuations will depend upon the amount and value of taxable property within the District as determined in the assessment and the equalization process.

Dated: 07/18/2016

/s/ Dr. Joe Wyse

Superintendent/President, Shasta-Tehama-Trinity Joint Community College District


 

Full text of Measure H 

PROJECTS

The Board of Trustees of the Shasta-Tehama-Trinity Joint Community College District, to be responsive to the needs of its community, evaluated Shasta College’s urgent and critical facility needs, and its capacity to provide students, active military and Veterans with support facilities, an affordable education and prepare them for success in college and careers.  Job training, safety issues, enrollment, class size reduction and class offerings, and information and computer technology infrastructure were each considered, in developing the scope of projects to be funded.  In developing the scope of projects, multiple forums were held and local job training and job placement needs, particularly in fire, law enforcement, emergency medical training, science, math, technology and engineering training, were prioritized, as well as facilities supporting an affordable education, ensuring the most critical needs that will make Shasta College an effective place for learning will be addressed.   The Board of Trustees determines that Shasta College MUST:

(i)         PROVIDE TRAINING AND EDUCATION FOR BETTER PAYING JOBS; AND

(ii)       INCREASE EDUCATION AND JOB TRAINING OPPORTUNITIES FOR MILITARY VETERANS; AND

(iii)      KEEP ALL FUNDS SUBJECT TO LOCAL CONTROL AND REMAIN LOCAL AT SHASTA COLLEGE, AND NOT BE TAKEN BY THE STATE.

Academic Facility and Technology Upgrade Projects To Help Students,
Military Veterans Train For Better Paying Jobs

Goal and Purpose:  A quality college is good for the local economy because it provides training and education for a skilled workforce and job preparedness.

·        Upgrade and expand facilities for career training in well-paying careers and transfer to universities.

·        Construct classrooms and training facilities for career technical education, including computer science, welding, manufacturing and automotive jobs.

·        Expand facilities for veterans to provide career training and support services to returning veterans seeking training or retraining to reenter the workforce.

·        Provide new science, math and computer labs and expand College facilities providing instruction in Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM).

·        Install additional technology infrastructure to improve computer technology and Internet access.

·        Construct a regional public safety training center grounds to provide educational programs for fire, law enforcement and emergency medical training.

·        Upgrade and replace existing information technology infrastructure and network systems to improve efficiency and increase capacity.

·        Upgrade old restrooms and replace deteriorating plumbing and sewer systems.

·        Upgrade outdated and inadequate electrical systems.

·        Renovate, repair or replace outdated 50-year old laboratories, classrooms, and support facilities.

·        Improve student safety, disabled access, emergency preparedness, and security systems, including security cameras, emergency mass announcement systems, lighting, fencing, smoke detectors, fire alarms and sprinklers.

·        Repair deteriorating electrical lines.

FISCAL ACCOUNTABILITY

This bond measure has strict accountability requirements including (a) an independent Citizens’ Oversight Committee with representation from throughout our region; (b) annual financial audits to make sure money is being spent as promised; (c) no money from this measure will go towards salaries or pensions, and (d) all money will stay local and cannot be taken by the State.

1.  NO ADMINISTRATOR SALARIES.  Proceeds from the sale of the bonds authorized by this proposition shall be used only for the acquisition, construction, reconstruction, rehabilitation, or replacement of school facilities, including the furnishing and equipping of school facilities, and not for any other purpose, including teacher, faculty and college administrator salaries, pensions and other operating expenses.

2.  FISCAL ACCOUNTABILITY.  THE EXPENDITURE OF BOND MONEY ON THESE PROJECTS IS SUBJECT TO STRINGENT FINANCIAL ACCOUNTABILITY REQUIREMENTS.  BY LAW, PERFORMANCE AND FINANCIAL AUDITS WILL BE PERFORMED ANNUALLY, AND ALL BOND EXPENDITURES WILL BE MONITORED BY AN INDEPENDENT CITIZENS’ OVERSIGHT COMMITTEE TO ENSURE THAT FUNDS ARE SPENT AS PROMISED AND SPECIFIED.  THE CITIZENS’ OVERSIGHT COMMITTEE MUST INCLUDE, AMONG OTHERS, REPRESENTATION OF A BONA FIDE TAXPAYERS ASSOCIATION, A BUSINESS ORGANIZATION AND A SENIOR CITIZENS ORGANIZATION.  NO DISTRICT EMPLOYEES OR VENDORS ARE ALLOWED TO SERVE ON THE CITIZENS’ OVERSIGHT COMMITTEE.

The listed projects will be completed as needed.  Each project is assumed to include its share of furniture, equipment, architectural, engineering, and similar planning costs, program/project management, staff training expenses and a customary contingency.  In addition to the listed projects stated above, authorized projects also include the acquisition of a variety of instructional, maintenance and operational equipment, including the reduction or retirement of outstanding lease obligations and interim funding incurred to advance fund projects from payment of the costs of preparation of all facility planning, facility studies, assessment reviews, facility master plan preparation and updates, environmental studies (including environmental investigation, remediation and monitoring), design and construction documentation, and temporary housing of dislocated college activities caused by construction projects. In addition to the projects listed above, repair, renovation and construction projects may include, but not be limited to, some or all of the following: renovation of student and staff restrooms; replace aging electrical and plumbing systems; repair and replacement of heating and ventilation systems; upgrade of facilities for energy efficiencies, including photovoltaic/ solar installations; repair and replacement of worn-out and leaky roofs, windows, walls doors and drinking fountains; removal of outdated buildings and construction of new classrooms and support buildings; installation of wiring and electrical systems to safely accommodate computers, technology and other electrical devices and needs; upgrade facilities to meet current earthquake safety standards; repair and replacement of fire alarms, emergency communications and security systems; upgrading, resurfacing, replacing or relocating of hard courts, fields, turf and

 

irrigation systems; upgrade classrooms; expand Tehama facilities to provide enhanced student services for students and veterans; install additional technology infrastructure to improve computer technology and Internet access on the Main Campus, Downtown Campus, Intermountain Campus, Trinity Campus and Tehama Campus; build or upgrade facilities for math, physical sciences, agriculture, fine arts, and performing arts; improve campus signage; upgrade existing parking lots; repair, upgrade and install interior and exterior lighting systems; replace water and sewer lines and other plumbing systems; construct, upgrade or expand humanities buildings, physical education/ aquatic facilities, gym, locker rooms, administrative offices, public safety office, maintenance building, student service/ campus center, student housing and instructional buildings, trades and technology buildings, library, auto shop, athletic fields, student services building, parking lots, turf; improve water conservation and energy efficiency; acquire land; replace elevators; replace outdated security systems; replace existing window systems with energy-efficient systems to reduce costs; improve insulation, weatherproofing and roofs to reduce costs; improve access for the disabled; install and repair fire safety equipment, including alarms, smoke detectors, sprinklers, emergency lighting, and fire safety doors; replace broken concrete walks, deteriorated asphalt; replace/upgrade existing signage, bells and clocks; demolition of unsafe facilities; install new security systems, such as security (surveillance) cameras, emergency mass announcement systems, outdoor lighting, fencing, gates and classroom door locks; replace sewer lines and improve drainage systems to prevent flooding; upgrade roadway and pedestrian paths for improved safety and access for emergency vehicles, site parking, utilities and grounds.  The project list also includes the refinancing of outstanding lease obligations.  The upgrading of technology infrastructure includes, but is not limited to, the acquisition of computers, LCD projectors, portable interface devices, servers, switches, routers, modules, sound projection systems, information systems, printers, digital white boards, upgrade voice-over-IP, communication systems, audio/visual and telecommunications systems, call manager and network security/firewall, Internet connectivity, wireless systems, technology infrastructure, and other miscellaneous equipment. 

The allocation of bond proceeds will be affected by the District’s receipt of State matching funds and the final costs of each project.  In the absence of State matching funds, which the District will aggressively pursue to reduce the District’s share of the costs of the projects, the District will not be able to complete some of the projects listed above.  Some projects may be undertaken as joint use projects in cooperation with other local public or non-profit agencies.  The budget for each project is an estimate and may be affected by factors beyond the District’s control. The final cost of each project will be determined as plans and construction documents are finalized, construction bids are received, construction contracts are awarded and projects are completed.  Based on the final costs of each project, certain of the projects described above may be delayed or may not be completed.  Demolition of existing facilities and reconstruction of facilities scheduled for repair and upgrade may occur, if the Board determines that such an approach would be more cost-effective in creating more enhanced and operationally efficient campuses.  Necessary site preparation/restoration may occur in connection with new construction, renovation or remodeling, or installation or removal of relocatable classrooms, including ingress and egress, removing, replacing, or installing irrigation, utility lines, trees and landscaping, relocating fire access roads, and acquiring any necessary easements, licenses, or rights of way to the property.  Proceeds of the bonds may be used to pay or reimburse the District for the cost of District staff when performing work on or necessary and incidental to bond projects. 

 

Bond proceeds shall only be expended for the specific purposes identified herein.  The District shall create an account into which proceeds of the bonds shall be deposited and comply with the reporting requirements of Government Code § 53410.

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