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League of Women Voters of California Education Fund
KPBS Voters Guide@KPBSNews
November 8, 2016 — Elección General de California
Distrito especial

Claremont Unified School District
Measure G Bond Measure - 55% Approval Required

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Resultados electorales

Se aprueba

12,236 votos si (67.36%)

5,928 votos no (32.64%)

100% de distritos activos (30/30).

$58 Million in Bonds for Upgrades to School Facilities and Systems
— undefined

To repair, upgrade and make more energy efficient aging classrooms and facilities with funding that cannot be taken by the State, repair deteriorating roofs, heating, air conditioning and electrical systems, and repair, construct, acquire, and upgrade classrooms, sites, facilities and equipment, refurbish pools, locker rooms, and gymnasium, shall Claremont Unified School District issue $58,000,000 in bonds at legal rates, with independent financial audits, citizen oversight, no money for administrator and teacher salaries, and all money staying local?

¿Qué es esta propuesta?

Información básica sobre la iniciativa de ley — Información oficial sobre esta iniciativa

Análisis del analista legislativo / Proposal

By Mary C. Wickham, County Counsel

Approval of Measure G (“Measure”) would authorize the Board of Education

(“Board”) of the Claremont Unified School District (“District”), which placed

the Measure on the ballot by Resolution No. 02-2017, to issue general obligation

bonds in an amount not to exceed $58,000,000.

Proceeds from the sale of bonds authorized by the Measure shall be used only

for the purposes specified in the Measure, including, but not limited to, repairing

and upgrading classrooms and other learning environments; replacing portable

classrooms with modular classrooms; refurbishing pools, locker rooms, and

gymnasium; replacing and refurbishing roofs; replacing heating, ventilation, and

air-conditioning systems; and upgrading electrical systems. Bond proceeds may

not be expended on teacher and administrator salaries and pensions and other

operating expenses.

The Board shall cause independent performance and financial audits to be

conducted annually to ensure that bond proceeds are spent only for the projects

identified in the Measure. The Board shall cause the appointment of an

independent Citizens’ Oversight Committee in accordance with Education

Code section 15278 no later than 60 days after the Board enters

the election results in its minutes to ensure that bond proceeds are spent as specified in the Measure

and as provided by law. The District shall create an account into which bond

proceeds shall be deposited and shall comply with the reporting requirements of

Government Code section 53410.

The maximum rate of interest on any bond shall not exceed the maximum rate

allowed by law. According to the District’s Tax Rate Statement, the best estimate

of the highest tax rate required to fund the bonds, based on a projection of

assessed valuations available when the District filed its Tax Rate Statement, is

$45.30 per $100,000 of assessed valuation in fiscal year 2023-24.

This Measure requires a fifty-five percent (55%) vote for passage.

 

 

Tax rate

An election will be held in the Claremont Unified School District (the “District”)

on November 8, 2016, on the question of issuing bonds in the principal amount

of $58,000,000 to finance improvements to the District’s facilities as described in

the bond measure. If the bonds are approved, the District expects to sell the

bonds in several series beginning in 2017. Principal and interest on the bonds will

be paid from taxes levied on taxable property in the District. The following tax

rate information is given to comply with Sections 9400-9404 of the Elections

Code of the State of California.

Based on estimated assessed valuations available at the time of filing of this

statement:

1.The best estimate of the tax rate that would be required to be levied to fund

the bond issue during the first fiscal year after the sale of the first series of bonds,

based on estimated assessed valuations available at the time of filing of this

statement, is $0.0295 per $100 ($29.50 per $100,000) of assessed valuation in

fiscal year 2017/18.

2.The best estimate of the tax rate that would be required to be levied to fund

the bond issue during the first fiscal year after the last sale of the bonds, based on

estimated assessed valuations available at the time of filing of this statement, is

$0.0453 per $100 ($45.30 per $100,000) of assessed valuation in fiscal year

2023/24.

3.The best estimate of the highest tax rate that would be required to be levied to

fund the bond issue, based on estimated assessed valuations available at the time

of filing this statement, is $0.0453 per $100 ($45.30 per $100,000) of assessed

valuation in fiscal year 2023/24.

4.The best estimate of the total bond debt service, including principal and

interest, which would be required to be repaid, if all the bonds are issued and

sold, based on interest rate information along with assessed valuations available

at the time of the election and taking into account the estimated future growth is

$105,000,000.

The attention of all voters is directed to the fact that the foregoing information is

based upon projections and estimates only. The actual tax rates and the years in

which they will apply may vary from those presently estimated, due to variations

from these estimates in the timing of bond sales, the number of bonds sold and

market interest rates at the time of each sale, and actual assessed valuations over

the term of repayment of the bonds. The date of sale and the number of bonds

sold at any given time will be determined by the District based on its need for

construction funds and other factors. The actual interest rates at which the bonds

will be sold will depend on the bond market at the time of sale. Actual future

assessed valuations will depend upon the amount and value of taxable property

within the District as determined by the Los Angeles County Assessor in the

annual assessment and the equalization process. Accordingly, the actual tax rates

and the years in which such rates are applicable may vary from those presently

estimated as above stated.

 

Dated: August 5, 2016

JAMES ELSASSER, Ed. D.

Superintendent of the

Claremont Unified School District

 

 

Published Arguments — Arguments for and against the ballot measure

Argumento A FAVOR

Throughout its history Claremont has placed a high value on education, and it

forms the foundation of our civic life. Our public schools are central to this: they

prepare informed voters, educate a superior workforce, expand business

opportunity, and promote strong property values.

 

A YES vote strengthens our community by providing students with facilities that

are clean and safe and promote learning. It will provide $58 million for much

needed repairs at every school site in the District, including:

-Portables: replace identified portables with permanent modular units;

-Classrooms: upgrade identified classroom windows, coverings, cabinetry,

lighting, flooring;

-Pools: refurbish, repair, replace equipment, decking, fencing;

-Locker rooms: upgrade windows, plumbing, lockers, showers, lighting,

accessibility;

-Music building: upgrade flooring, ceilings, acoustics, lighting;

-Student Center: replace building, add teaching space;

-Food prep: reconfigure and upgrade building;

-Large gym: replace flooring, add HVAC, accessibility; and

-Infrastructure: replace roofing; upgrade heating, ventilation, A/C

;upgrade electrical: install Energy Management System; add wiring, outlets, and security cameras as needed.

The District has demonstrated fiscal prudence by selecting high priority projects

based on a Facilities Needs Assessment that identified $111 million in needed

repairs and improvements. The list was reduced to the most critical projects

which are manageable in the near term.

The District has involved the community in decision-making, conducting

extensive outreach through 39 community meetings and the on-line

“Thought Exchange” process which can be reviewed at 

www.cusd.thoughtexchange.com/welcome.

The law specifies accountability measures, with a Citizens’ Oversight Committee

and periodic independent financial audits.

Vote YES to join with homeowners, educators, employers and community leaders

who have formed Claremont RISE (Renew Infrastructure, Sustain Excellence)

to support our schools. For more information, go to www.ClaremontRISE.org

 

KARA EVANS

Claremont High School Teacher

LYNN FORESTER

CHS/ASB Office Manager/Classified Employee of the Year

STIG LANESSKOG

CEO, Claremont University Consortium

NICOLE OUELLETTE

President-Elect, Claremont Educational Foundation

SONJA STUMP

Claremont Business Owner/Community Volunteer

 

 

Argumento EN CONTRA

CUSD has done a superb job shepherding our schools through an economically

difficult decade. With the help of one-time funds from the sale of surplus

properties, several outstanding projects have proven the District’s competent

management. Examples include the El Roble Gym, the CHS Science Building,

and the Don F. Fruechte Theatre.

Facilities must be renewed regularly or become unusable. Claremont schools

have fallen behind because of inadequate funding, which Measure G will correct.

The selected projects reflect priorities expressed by residents. Information about

the projects and how they were developed is posted on the CUSD

website: www.cusd.claremont.edu.

The annual operating budget can only provide limited support for maintenance

and repair, and funds such as those provided by the Recreation Assessment are

tightly restricted. By policy, the state expects communities to assume financial

responsibility for renewal and modernization of school facilities. 82% of bond

measures proposed for this purpose since 2001 have been approved by voters.

Inter-district transfers offer enormous benefits, supporting award-winning

programs not affordable without economies of scale. Inter-district families do

contribute to facilities through State bonds, like Proposition 51, that provide

matching funds.

Opponents to Measure G seem motivated by a fundamental antagonism to taxes.

They would have us sacrifice the future of our children’s education because of

alleged management errors that are contradicted by the documented excellence

of our schools. Measure G is right-sized and locally controlled with oversight by

citizens.

Vote YESon Measure G!

THOMAS A. CERAFICE

Resident/Claremont Business Owner

JOAN BUNTE

Board Member, Claremont Village Marketing Group

SUE KEITH

Claremont Representative to the Citrus

College Board of Trustees

BRIAN DEMOTT

Claremont Realtor

SANDRA HOLLENBERG, MD

Pediatrician

 

 

Refutación al argumento A FAVOR

The proponents make no argument at all for this $58,000,000 bond. They simply

give a few plain-vanilla statements using soft words like “civic life”, “clean”, and

“safe”, followed by a list.

In fact, this measure is unfair and costly.

It is unfair because outside students—one quarter of the total—are getting a free

ride. These are inter-district transfer students that Claremont imports. They live

outside the district. You pay for this bond but their households don’t.

The District claims these students make for a richer program in Claremont, but

what about neighboring districts that are poorer because their students ship out

to Claremont?

This bond enables Wall Street bankers and lenders to dictate District enrollment

policy.

For example, the Superintendent has emphasized his ability to “manage”

enrollment to satisfy the lenders by sending some transfer students back if

demanded. He is also willing to further poach neighboring districts for more

students—diluting our kids’ education—should Wall Street require that.

Measure G is expensive with skewed priorities. One item: it spends almost

$7,000,000—nearly 12%—for “student center and food preparation” at

Claremont High School, not for direct instructional facilities. These are bells and whistles, not core education.

From the official Tax Rate Statement, this measure will cost the average

property owner some $7,000 to $8,000 or even more. It’s a burden for those on

fixed incomes. It will be a lien on your property and you could lose your home

through foreclosure.

Vote NO on Measure G. Visit NOCLAREMONTBOND.COM

GARY M. LOWE

Claremont Resident

JAY N. POCOCK

Claremont Resident

DONNA LOWE

Claremont Resident

TERESA BURGDORF

Claremont Resident

DAVID BURGDORF

School Administrator/

College Professor

 

 

Refutación al argumento EN CONTRA

Please reject Measure G. VOTE NO!

This ill-advised bond follows the mismanaged Measure Y and the defeated

Measure CL bonds. CUSD has demonstrated over the years that it cannot

prudently steward your property tax money. Many Measure Y projects went uncompleted and the Measure CL narrative wasn’t believed by the voters.

Spending priorities at the District recently have been backwards as well.

Developer fees and your Recreation Assessments have been diverted from

prudent maintenance of roofs, pools, buildings, and other items. Now they want

you to go into debt for the accumulated wear and tear.

Using capital and instructional monies, the District financed millions for its

spacious three-story offices and for air conditioning equipment that would here

be scrapped and replaced. This equipment is so new the District owes on its

financing at some $560,000 yearly for the next fifteen years. Now the District

plans on adding a second payment to the first.

Inter-District Transfers from outside communities comprise some 24% of the

students in our schools but their households will not pay a dime for this measure.

These 1,685 extra students are the bulk of the “need” for portable and modular

classrooms but you will pay.

Measure G is proposed at a time when government at every level is demanding

more. A $9 billion state school bond is on this ballot. The Los Angeles County

Metropolitan Transportation Authority wants a 10% PERMANENT sales tax

hike. The City of Claremont will attempt another police station bond in 2017,

and the County of Los Angeles plans a large property charge for

stormwater drainage next year as well.

A big question mark is Claremont’s planned eminent domain taking of the water

company. If that goes forward, huge yearly fixed charges to each property will

result.

This bond is too much.

Please vote NO to defeat Measure G

GARY M. LOWE

Claremont Resident

JAY N. POCOCK

Claremont Resident

DONNA LOWE

Claremont Resident

DAVID BURGDORF

School Administrator/College Professor

TERESA BURGDORF

 

Claremont Resident

Leer la legislación propuesta

Legislación propuesta

The following is the full proposition presented to the voters by the Claremont

Unified School District.

“To repair, upgrade and make more energy efficient aging classrooms and

facilities with funding that cannot be taken by the State, repair deteriorating

roofs, heating, air conditioning and electrical systems, and repair, construct,

acquire, and upgrade classrooms, sites, facilities and equipment, refurbish pools,

locker rooms, and gymnasium, shall Claremont Unified School District issue

$58,000,000 in bonds at legal rates, with independent financial audits, citizen

oversight, no money for administrator and teacher salaries, and all money staying

local?”

 PROJECT LIST

The Board of Education of the Claremont Unified School District is committed

to improving the quality of education and student learning environment, and

upgrading facilities for energy conservation or to increase use of renewable

energy sources in its award winning local schools, to provide our community with

safe, secure and upgraded classrooms which keep pace with 21st Century learning

standards. To that end, in developing the scope of projects to be funded, the

Board evaluated the District’s urgent and critical facility needs, including safety

issues, class size, and computer and information technology. The District 

conducted a facilities evaluation and received public input in developing this

Project List, and further determined to upgrade facilities and not to use bond

proceeds to purchase any technology equipment. Teachers, staff, community

members and the Board have prioritized key health and safety projects so that

the most critical facility needs are addressed.

 

Basic School Repair and Upgrade Projects

–Repair and upgrade classrooms and other learning environments

–Replace deteriorating portable classrooms with modular classrooms

–Refurbish pools, locker rooms, and gymnasium

–Replace and refurbish deteriorating roofs

–Replace outdated and inefficient heating, ventilation and air-conditioning

systems

–Upgrade electrical systems

The listed projects will be completed as needed. Each project is assumed to

include its share of architectural, engineering, and similar planning costs,

program/project management, furniture, equipment, staff training expenses and

a customary contingency for unforeseen design and construction costs. In

addition to the listed projects stated above, the Project List also includes the

acquisition of a variety of instructional, maintenance and operational equipment,

the reduction or retirement of interim or bridge funding incurred to advance

fund projects from the Project List; payment of the costs of preparation of all

facility planning, facility studies, assessment reviews, facility master plan

preparation and updates, environmental studies (including environmental

investigation, remediation and monitoring), design and construction

documentation, and temporary housing of dislocated District activities caused by

construction projects. In addition to the projects listed above, the repair and

renovation of each of the existing school facilities may include, but not be limited

to, some or all of the following: repair and replace heating/boiler, plumbing, gas,

water/sewer, drainage and ventilation systems; renovate student and staff

restrooms; acquire facilities for educational purposes; improve outdoor learning

spaces and shade structures; upgrade of facilities for energy conservation or to

increase use of renewable energy sources; replace and refurbish worn-out roofs;

repair and replace windows, walls, doors, doorframes and drinking fountains;

improve school facilities for disability access; install or upgrade wiring and

electrical systems to safely accommodate computers, technology and other

electrical devices and needs; upgrade or construct classrooms and support

facilities, including physical education facilities (including gym, pools and locker

rooms), music building, student center, kitchens and food prep facilities; repair

and replace deteriorating asphalt, fire alarms, emergency communications,

intercoms, public announcement, energy management systems (EMS), and

security systems; improve or expand parking and traffic circulation flow; interior

and exterior painting and floor covering; construct various forms of storage and

support spaces; upgrade classrooms; repair, upgrade or install interior and

exterior lighting systems; replace outdated security fences and security systems.

The allocation of bond proceeds will be affected by the final costs of each

project. Based on the final costs of each project, certain of the projects described

above may be delayed or may not be completed. The budget for each project is

an estimate and may be affected by factors beyond the District’s control. The

final cost of each project will be determined as plans and construction documents

are finalized, construction bids are received, construction contracts are awarded

and projects are completed. The allocation of bond proceeds may be affected by

the final costs of each project. The allocation of bond proceeds may be affected

by the District’s receipt of State matching funds and the final costs of each

project. Demolition of existing facilities and reconstruction of facilities scheduled

for repair and upgrade may occur, if the Board determines that such an approach

would be more cost-effective in creating more enhanced and operationally

efficient campuses. Necessary site preparation/restoration or geological

stabilization may occur in connection with new construction, renovation or

remodeling, or installation or removal of relocatable classrooms, including

ingress and egress, removing, replacing, or installing irrigation, utility lines, trees

and landscaping, relocating fire access roads, and acquiring any necessary

easements, licenses, or rights of way to the property. Proceeds of the bonds may

be used to pay or reimburse the District for the cost of District staff when

performing work on or necessary and incidental to bond projects.

Bond proceeds shall only be expended for the specific purposes identified

herein. The District shall create an account into which proceeds of the bonds

shall be deposited and comply with the reporting requirements of Government

Code § 53410.

  

FISCAL ACCOUNTABILITY: IN ACCORDANCE WITH EDUCATION CODE

SECTION 15272, THE BOARD OF EDUCATION WILL APPOINT A

CITIZENS’ OVERSIGHT COMMITTEE AND CONDUCT ANNUAL

INDEPENDENTAUDITS TO ASSURE THAT FUNDS ARE SPENT ONLY ON

DISTRICT PROJECTS AND FOR NO OTHER PURPOSE. THE

EXPENDITURE OF BOND MONEY ON THESE PROJECTS IS SUBJECT TO

STRINGENT FINANCIAL ACCOUNTABILITY REQUIREMENTS. BY LAW,

PERFORMANCE AND FINANCIAL AUDITS WILL BE PERFORMED

ANNUALLY, AND ALL BOND EXPENDITURES WILL BE MONITORED BY

AN INDEPENDENT CITIZENS’ OVERSIGHT COMMITTEE TO ENSURE

THAT FUNDS ARE SPENT AS PROMISED AND SPECIFIED. THE

CITIZENS’ OVERSIGHT COMMITTEE MUST INCLUDE, AMONG

OTHERS, REPRESENTATION OF A BONA FIDE TAXPAYERS

ASSOCIATION, A BUSINESS ORGANIZATION AND A SENIOR CITIZENS

ORGANIZATION. NO DISTRICT EMPLOYEES OR VENDORS ARE

ALLOWED TO SERVE ON THE CITIZENS’ OVERSIGHT COMMITTEE.

 NO ADMINISTRATOR SALARIES: PROCEEDS FROM THE SALE OF

THE BONDS AUTHORIZED BY THIS PROPOSITION SHALL BE USED

ONLY FOR THE ACQUISITION, CONSTRUCTION,

RECONSTRUCTION, REHABILITATION, OR REPLACEMENT OF

SCHOOL FACILITIES, INCLUDING THE FURNISHING AND

EQUIPPING OF SCHOOL FACILITIES, AND NOT FOR ANY OTHER

PURPOSE, INCLUDING TEACHER AND SCHOOL ADMINISTRATOR

SALARIES AND OTHER OPERATING EXPENSES.

 

BOND ISSUANCE LIMITS

This measure has strict limits on the issuance of bonds including:

1.Bonds must be phased in over time so that project success can be determined

before more bonds are issued.

2.Bonds must have a term not longer than the useful life of the projects or

equipment being financed.

3.The availability of State matching funds shall be considered in selecting

projects.

4.No capital appreciation bonds shall be issued.

 

 

 

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