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April 10, 2018 — Local Elections
Local

Ciudad de Long BeachCandidato para Consejo Municipal, Distrito 7

Photo de Kevin C. Shin

Kevin C. Shin

Non-profit Success Consultant
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Mis 3 prioridades principales

  • Maintaining housing affordability as housing is the cornerstone for many other issues of opportunity, including basic health, educational access, and wealth building
  • Ensuring safe and vibrant streets which means creating accessible communities with restaurants, grocery stores, banks, and other basic amenities that all residents can enjoy safely
  • Restoring and maintaining a clean and health environment by providing access to clean air, healthy food, and green spaces for all residents

Experiencia

Experiencia

Profesión:Non-profit Success Consultant
Customer Success Manager, Lead, Blackbaud, Inc. (2008–current)

Educación

George Washington University Master of Business Administration (M.B.A.), Entrepreneurship and International Finance (2008)
Claremont McKenna College Bachelor of Arts (B.A.), Biotechnology and Business Management (2004)

Actividades comunitarias

Co-Founder, current Co-Chair, Walk Bike Long Beach (2015–current)
Steering Committee Member, Healthy Active Streets (2017–current)
Supporter/volunteer, East Yard Communities for Environmental Justice (2016–current)
Supporter/volunteer, Building Healthy Communities Long Beach (2016–current)
Supporter/volunteer, Los Angeles County Bicycle Coalition (2015–current)

Biografía

As a proud immigrant who came to the United States at the age of three, I was raised in Diamond Bar and Torrance by parents who worked hard as small business owners to provide the best life they could for my younger brother and me. Like many immigrant families, my parents instilled in me the values of honesty, hard work, cultural pride, and service to community. These core values have guided me through school, career, family life, and now my run for City Council.

 

I graduated from Claremont McKenna College with a bachelor’s degree in Biotechnology and Business Management and then headed to the East Coast to launch my career in business strategy consulting. After earning my MBA at George Washington University, I have spent the bulk of my career at Blackbaud, Inc. helping nonprofit organizations, including children’s hospitals, achieve their goals through fundraising, marketing, and advocacy.

 

While I love that my day job allows me to work with terrific clients and causes, my real passion is my volunteer work in the local community advocating for traffic safety and environmental health.

 

Nearly three years ago, I co-founded Walk Bike Long Beach, a local pedestrian and bicycle safety advocacy group that fights to bring safer streets, greater walkability, and cleaner air to our communities, especially the underserved communities of Central, North, and West Long Beach. Through spearheading Walk Bike Long Beach, I have partnered with many other community-based organizations and have led or actively participated in various advocacy initiatives in the 7th District. Specifically, I:

  • Started a coalition to highlight overlooked neighborhoods and promote community-centered redevelopment along Willow Street and Santa Fe Avenue

  • Advocated for housing and infrastructure improvements along the I-710 corridor as part of the I-710 Livability Study

  • Pushed for safe routes to school across the LA River as part of the Lower LA River Revitalization Plan

  • Participated in the Clean Air Action Plan working groups to promote environmental health for all Long Beach residents

 

When I’m not working either my day job or volunteer job, my wife Elsa and I enjoy walking and training our rescue dog Winter (we’ve taught her 25+ commands). You may also see me riding around town on my bicycle or motorcycle, exploring the city’s amazing restaurants and ethnic foods.

¿Quién apoya a este candidato?

Organizaciónes (2)

  • Los Angeles League of Conservation Voters
  • Run for Something

Individuos (4)

  • Julie Baker, Lifelong District Resident
  • Ayana Cobb, U.S. Army Veteran/Mother
  • Kisha Williamson, Lifelong District Resident
  • Danny Gamboa, Lifelong Resident/Safe Streets Advocate

Creencias poliza

Filosofía política

I am dedicated to representing and serving the incredible residents of the 7th District. I am not here to serve special interests and have turned down all Political Action Committee (PAC) funding. I am not here to create a legacy. I am not here to use this as a stepping stone to higher office.

 

I am here to be a voice for the community. The residents of the 7th District deserve someone who will fight for them, who will hear their concerns and champion their needs. I’ve already been championing the 7th District as a community advocate, and I will continue to do so as a councilmember.

Documentos sobre determinadas posturas

Environmental health

Summary

Toxic pollution and the environmental health consequences are the most widespread issues of the 7th District, even if they are not top of mind for all residents. The 7th District is the only district that suffers the severe pollution impacts of two freeways, the Ports, railyards, refineries, and an airport. Residents living near freeways and exposed to air pollution have higher rates of asthma, heart attacks, strokes, and lung cancer. I will continue to fight to improve environmental health for all residents of our district.

Toxic pollution and the environmental health consequences are the most widespread issues of the 7th District, even if they are not top of mind for all residents. The 7th District is the only district that suffers the severe pollution impacts of two freeways, the Ports, railyards, refineries, and an airport. Residents living near freeways and exposed to air pollution have higher rates of asthma, heart attacks, strokes, and lung cancer. This toxic pollution, combined with inadequate green space and healthy food options, are a major factor why parts of the 7th District experience some of the most challenging health outcomes and lowest life expectancies in the city.

 

To address these environmental health issues, which disproportionately impact low-income communities of color, I will continue to fight for cleaner air through the phase-in and requirement of zero-emissions mandates for the Ports and railyards. Doing so will help ensure a verifiable reduction in both greenhouse gas and particulate emissions, both of which have a significant impact on the health of our residents. I will also invest in the development and maintenance of our parks and green spaces, not just to have vital community spaces for exercise and play, but also to filter pollution, sequester carbon, and capture and clean stormwater.

 

In addition, I will support further incentives to renewable energy adoption for homes and businesses, thus reducing the city’s overall dependence on fossil fuel energy and providing access to potential backup capacity during power outages. I will also support expanding electric vehicle (EV) charging networks to encourage the transition from gasoline-powered personal vehicles to zero-emission EVs.

 

By taking all of these critical steps, we can begin to dial back the environmental impacts of toxic pollution in our communities. However, many of these changes will take time, so in the near term, we must continue to optimize existing projects to prioritize for the greatest impact. For instance, the current projects to help install air conditioning and air filtration in our schools needs to be updated to help ensure that the schools most affected by air pollution should get prioritized to receive the systems first as those students already suffer the most from the pervasive air quality issues. We should also continue to encourage tree planting in order both to help beautify the community, but also assist with carbon sequestration.

 

My background and track record of addressing environmental health has been recognized by the Los Angeles League of Conservation Voters, which has endorsed my campaign.

Homelessness

Summary

Homelessness is a complex and unfortunately chronic issue that is directly tied to housing affordability and social services. We can help address the issue both reactively and proactively by dedicating resources to help city staff more effectively work with current homeless populations.

Homelessness is a complex and unfortunately chronic issue that is directly tied to housing affordability and social services. Long Beach has only a handful of city employees who have responsibility for addressing homelessness in the entire city of nearly half a million people. When it takes an average of 17 contacts at almost one hour per contact in order to encourage a homeless individual to accept assistance, it can be a daunting task for the city’s limited staff to be able to tackle the issue. We must start by helping the city identify additional resources who can assist with contacting and engaging with homeless individuals. These resources do not necessarily need to come out of the city’s budget as there are community-based organizations and volunteers who would likely be willing to help reduce the workload of the city employees.

 

The other aspect of combating homelessness is housing affordability. Long Beach has a rental vacancy rate of only 2 percent, and with more than 60 percent of the city’s residents as renters, there is a dire need for more rental housing stock, especially affordable rental housing. Oftentimes, when people think of rental housing, they think of run-down properties surrounded by tall gates to keep the poor residents confined to their community. If this is the image of affordable housing, which really sounds more like the image of a prison, then I too would not want that in my neighborhood either. But the reality is that affordable housing no longer needs to look or feel like that.

 

We are fortunate enough in Long Beach to have a shining example of what an affordable housing community can be in the form of Century Villages at Cabrillo (CVC). A public-private partnership that has the support of over a dozen different organizations, CVC offers transitional housing for the homeless, affordable housing, treatment options for mental health as well as drug and alcohol addiction, along with access to VA services for formerly homeless or low-income veterans. It provides a community to people who have struggled with homelessness and helps support them through their transition while giving them access to basic necessities until they can get back on their own feet. By co-locating so many different services on-site with residents who are in need of such services, CVC provides a model of affordable housing that is not only effective at addressing the underlying causes of homelessness, but does so in a community setting that I believe many Long Beach residents would actually welcome to their neighborhoods. I recently had a tour of CVC and was blown away by how well-designed, well-built, and well-maintained everything was. For those who have not had the opportunity, I highly recommend the experience as it will change your thoughts on what affordable housing can be.

 

In the 7th District, because we are bisected by the LA River, which many homeless use as a means of getting around and also seek shelter on its banks or in the adjacent right-of-ways, we often see the symptoms of homelessness more than many other parts of the city. We are more impacted by the trash and sanitation issues and are subject to a higher percentage of homelessness related petty crimes. Safety and perceptions of safety in our neighborhoods are critical, and by focusing our efforts to tackle the root causes of homelessness, we can help address the issue both reactively and, more importantly, proactively. By dedicating resources to help city staff more effectively work with current homeless populations, we can get those individuals the help they need and want.

 

At the end of the day, we must tackle homelessness with compassion and ensure that everyone lives with dignity.

Oil and gas production

Summary

Long Beach has a history as an oil town, but that is our past and does not need to be our future. We have already seen the impacts of oil and gas production in our neighborhoods and we need to find ways to reduce the consumption over time and a stream of revenue that is not so subject to the whims of the market.

I recognize that Long Beach has a history as an oil town, but that is our past and does not need to be our future. Existing oil wells are going to be difficult to shut down, but we can limit and prevent construction of new ones and as existing ones run dry, we can have mechanisms in place to begin mitigation efforts. Those mitigation efforts need to take into consideration the long-term impacts on the surrounding areas and can no longer be done in a manner that severely impacts only those already disadvantaged neighborhoods, many of which are largely made up of people of color. We have already seen the toxic impacts of the oil wastewater treatment site in Wrigley Heights and should use that as an example of what not to do.

On the refining side, the release of toxic gases into our atmosphere is something that needs to be closely monitored. While there are already existing guidelines in place for allowable concentrations, the proximity of existing refining facilities to residential neighborhoods, especially lower income neighborhoods of color, causes a severe environmental equity gap that needs to be corrected. We should look at stricter enforcement of standards and continue to focus on holding oil concerns responsible for their actions. Also, any fees derived from violations should be used towards the clean-up and future mitigation of impact in the most affected neighborhoods.

Ultimately, Long Beach needs to find non-fossil fuel revenue sources that are not so subject to the whims of the market. That will give our city budget greater stability and will allow for better long term planning. We should also encourage incentives to switch to renewable options for homeowners, allowing us to cut back on our fossil fuel demand over time.

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