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November 6, 2018 — Elección General de California
Local

Ciudad de UplandCandidato para Miembre, Consejo Municipal, Distrito 4

Photo de Carol Timm

Carol Timm

Retired Teacher / Councilmember
1,680 votos (39.74%)
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Mis 3 prioridades principales

  • Maintain fiscal responsibility with a balanced budget and a healthy savings account.
  • Continue to increase quality Economic Development throughout the city.
  • Work to increase funding for infrastructure projects for fixing roads, sidewalks, and trimming trees.

Experiencia

Experiencia

Profesión:Retired Teacher/Upland City Council/Mayor Pro Tem
Member/ Mayor Pro Tem, Upland City Council — Cargo elegido (2014–2018)
Member/Chair, Upland Planning Commission — Cargo elegido (1998–2014)
Teacher, Mercury On-line Academy (2009–2011)
teacher, Upland Christian School (2005–2008)
teacher, Western Christian School (1987–2005)
Teacher, Upland Christian Day School (1982–1987)

Educación

University of South Carolina (current)
University of La Verne, CA Preliminary Multiple Subjects Teaching Credential, Education (2011)
University of South Carolina South Carolina Teaching Credential, Education (1977)
University of South Carolina Bachelor Degree in General Studies, Elementary Education (1976)

Actividades comunitarias

Trustee, West Valley Vector Control (2016–2018)
Board member/Deacon, Purpose Church (2014–2017)
President, Upland Heritage (1990–2014)
Board Member, Christian Board of Christian Education (1998–1999)
member, Inland Empire Preservation Coalition (1998–1999)

¿Quién apoya a este candidato?

Featured Endorsements

  • Upland Police Officers Association
  • PORAC Peace Officers Research Association of California
  • San Bernardino County Fire Association

Creencias poliza

Documentos sobre determinadas posturas

Fiscal Responsibility

Summary

The position paper is on Fiscal Responsibility and accomplishing that goal in the four years on the council.

 

Fiscal Responsibility

Carol’s main goal running for council  in 2014 was to protect Upland from bankruptcy. That was accomplished! Recently the outside auditor, Farr and Associates wrote “The city of Upland is showing signs that the city has been able to cut costs and operate more efficiently, positive signs Upland’s economy is improving”. The city adopted a balanced operation budget for this fiscal year and controls are in place to keep spending at those budgeted amounts. The council made very good decisions this year to save money with the Fire Annexation with savings of 3.3 million already this year.” This will save the city five million dollars per year in the future. Former San Bernardino County City Manager Gregory C. Devereaux, stated, “This is the best City Council (in Upland) we have had in years.”

 

The Upland General Fund—at one point in time– was well below one million dollars. Currently in 2018, it is over fifteen million dollars. Our CALPERS liability was lowered with our switching out of CALPERS medical and putting aside 5 million dollars to cover our CALPERS and OBEP liability. We’ve reorganized staff and management positions, created new revenue streams by renting out our underused city assets, and begun converting the Metrolink lot to paid parking—cumulatively saving or generating hundreds of thousands of dollars annually.

This year an outside auditor wrote, “The city of Upland is showing signs that the city has been able to cut costs and operate more efficiently, positive signs Upland’s economy is improving. The city has adopted a balanced operation budget for this fiscal year and controls are in place to keep spending at those budgeted amounts. The council made very good decisions this year to save money with the Fire Annexation with savings of 3.3 million already this year.” This will save the city five million dollars per year in the future.

Carol highlights the City of Upland’s financial stability:
• Our General fund Reserves – in 2013-was WELL below one million dollars. Currently, in 2018, it has been over 17 1/2 % of our General Fund and has grown progressively every year since I have been on the city council.
• The CALPERS liabilities were reduced by setting aside $7.2 million in a specially designated fund. The OPEB liabilities (other post-employment benefits) were reduced significantly by leaving CALPERS medical and we made changes to employee and retiree health care plans, setting aside $1 million for these future costs.
* Between our General Fund Savings and the savings for our CALPERS and OPEB, we have 12.8 million dollars in these accounts, back from a very small amount of savings when I came on the council.
• We’ve reorganized staff and management positions, created new revenue streams by renting out our underused city assets, and begun converting the Metrolink lot to paid parking—cumulatively saving or generating hundreds of thousands of dollars annually.

Economic Development in Upland

Summary

The paper describes the how increased development has progressed Upland forward.

 

Economic Development in Upland

Carol Timm helped revitalize Upland with façade improvements and successfully brought businesses and jobs to Downtown District 4. As Chair of the City Council’s Economic Development Committee, Timm has promoted and increased Economic Development throughout the city and attracted and assisted many new businesses including one of only three Whole Foods in the U.S. this year bringing in additional revenue to the city.  She advocated for Low interest Loans and Grants to improve and revitalize the Historic Downtown as promised and expanded job growth through the “City of Hope” and with forgivable loans to downtown business hiring Upland residents for jobs for two years or more.

EUCLID AVENUE AND FOOTHILL GET A FACELIFT IN
DISTRICT 4
Challenges are always ahead, but the progress made these past years are evident
through out our city. When you walk up historic Euclid Avenue you will see just how
far we have come. The trees look better than they have in years, thanks to an aggressive street maintenance and trimming program. We have also repaved Euclid
Avenue. Additionally, this program included parts of Foothill Boulevard, which is
also in our District.

PROJECTS TO IMPROVE DISTRICT 4
On the schedule for summer 2018 in District 4 are the full rehab of streets, historic curbs and infrastructure improvements for Third Avenue from A Street to 11th… 9th Street, from 3rd Avenue to Campus Avenue, and Campus Avenue from 7th Street to Foothill Boulevard in 2019. The bike path will receive $100,000 for improvements to slurry and stripe the whole bike path. In addition the city has also gotten a grant to plant 67 trees along the path and will get signalization on Euclid to make it safer. I helped start, “Friends of the Bike Path,” to change and improve our path through the southern half of the city.

NEW DEVELOPMENTS IN DISTRICT 4
Foothill and Euclid is seeing a total revitalization to the former Chick’s shopping
center with the coming of Burlington’s, Ross, Raising Canes, Starbucks and more.
The San Antonio Regional Hospital has expanded adding many new jobs to our
city, improving the medical care Upland needs. In addition, the City of Hope is
coming to our District to help Upland residents receive the highest quality of care
in cancer and cancer research. Memorial Park is getting a 4.2 million dollar facelift.
With my passion and experience we will move forward and District 4 will thrive.

UPLAND’S HISTORIC DOWNTOWN GETS GRANT MONEY TO FIX FACADES AND PROVIDES JOBS!
As Chair of the Economic Development Committee since 2017, Carol led the effort that secured Grants to help improve our Historic Downtown. This gave the incentive to restaurants and retail owners to hire local residents and restore Historic buildings, bringing in more businesses to the area. Seven businesses have been improved and more are coming! The City of Upland has won a statewide award for their program! A forgivable loan up to $50,000 is provided to eligible restaurant and retail businesses to cover the cost associated with opening a business in Downtown Upland in exchange for creating and retaining jobs for a period of up to 2 years.
Benefiting Bussinesses:
Rescue Brewing Company at 167 N. 2nd Avenue
Café Allegro at 186 N. 2nd Avenue
Paulie’s Pizza Pub at 247 N. 2nd Avenue
The Grove Theater at 276 E. 9th Street
Genoveva’s Fine Mexican Food and Grill at 273 E. 9th Street
Steel Details Inc. at 59 E. 9th Street
Sweet Obsession Cheesecakes at 220 E. “A” Street

 

Homelessness in Upland

Summary

This paper describes the processes taken to address homeless issues and dealing with these processes in the future.

Working With the Homeless Advisory Team and Future Goals

The City of Upland started a Homeless group in 2014 when I was serving on the Planning Commission. I joined this group to interface with individuals involved in helping homeless and to help set policy for the City of Upland. This group started a unique program that started with the Community Resource Officers or CRO team in our police department in 2015 shortly after I was elected. I was at that time the only public official that was a member. This type of team was based on a model called the HOPE team in San Bernardino County.
The CRO team would act as an intercessory to the homeless. Shortly after starting a group of advocates trained with the Police Department and they started working together. Most of those trained are todays CRT or Community Resource Team.

The CRO team would act as an intercessory to the homeless. Shortly after starting a group of advocates trained with the Police Department and they started working together.

In 2015, I organized and hosted the first Homeless Forum at the Cooper Museum to talk to the people about their concerns about the homeless issues in Upland. The CRO team, homeless Director, Doug Story, and myself and a moderator answered questions on homeless and how to deal with the issues.

A few months later, I hosted the Homeless Summit at the Catholic Church where we rented space. At the opening ceremonies it was said, “This is not a police problem, not a council problem, but a community problem.” We all need to work together to craft solutions today. We held numerous workshops to identify issues within the city and offer solutions.

In 2017 the City voted to hire a new Director, Eric Gavin who had been actively involved with the CRO team and the advocates from the beginning. He oversees the running of the advocates that would directly interface with the homeless individuals in Upland. This group also worked directly with wrap-around service providers to house the homeless. Between the CRO team and the CRT 139 homeless were housed permanently. All people housed get wrap around services and follow up visits by the team for at least one year.
The City of Upland noticed a lot of homeless in our parks, particularly Memorial Park. Many groups, not from Upland were feeding them and leaving refuse in the park. As a council and our police department, this policy was changed. With the help of the CRT and the police, Memorial Park was cleaned and the park was closed at dusk in all our parks.
The CRT team of advocates primary function is Street Outreach.  They frequently visit local parks and homeless encampments to make contact with people living on the streets.  This way, they begin to form a relationship with them so that we can learn about their needs and struggles better and work with them to craft a plan to exit homelessness.
The CRT works hand in hand with the Upland Police. They have a detailed list of all homeless along with the Police.
By 2018 the CRT had successfully housed many homeless in Upland. One of their programs in helping the homeless off the streets was their laundry ministry. During this period they were washing their clothing, the team would help address important issues with the person like getting them identifications, social security cards, Medical, Food Stamps, and provide compassionate help and other things they needed.
The CRT was also joined by Step up on Second” This group houses chronically homeless mentally ill homeless with wrap around services for life. They have housed about 15 of our most chronic cases in Upland thus far.

In 2018 months they leased a property that they could use as an affordable option for people living on the streets to transition out of homelessness.  It is responsibly located in an area that is zoned for its intended use. It is being used to help people find their way off the streets, but also to beautify and improve the surrounding neighborhood.
The city in September 2018 got a grant money from CDBG to assist in housing the homeless. Some of the usages are rental and move-in assistance. These funds will be used to get:

 

·       Bus tickets to reunite with loving/receiving family

 

·       Temporary “bridge” housing for those waiting on a firm move-in date

 

·       Miscellaneous supports needed to PREVENT an episode of homelessness

 

·       My goals to help the homeless are:

 

·       To intensely find grant funds to help homeless in Upland. We have now applied for a state grant close to a million in September 2018.

 

·       To expand the training of our advocates

 

·       To hire more advocates

 

·       To have money for training for mentally ill (UPD has done this)

 

·       To have reports about general work done by CRT presented at council meetings.

 

·       To get a social worker to join the team from the county.

 

·       To continue to interface county-wide with available services.

 

·       Continue to work with other groups to assist in finding homes for homeless or pre homeless.

 

·       Police have a specialized detail to specifically work with the issues of homelessness

 

·       To continue to house the homeless with wrap around services.

 

 

 

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